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Sunday: Ravens ready for major altitude adjustment


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#1 baltiMOREOandR

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 08:48 AM

Everything will be different on Sunday. Tens of thousands of men, woman and children will descend upon the Ravens nest clad in purple camouflage, donning purple beads and purple and black face paint. There will be a different feeling in the air from the beating the Ravens took in Denver. In fact, there will be more air available for the Ravens anxious to prove to the football world and their fans they are a team to be reckoned with.

The Ravens opened their quest for another championship season with a spirited first half. They entered the locker room at half time with a 17-14 lead. In the second half, the team ran out of gas or should we say oxygen. The Broncos not so secret weapon greats visiting teams on a sign above the locker room that reads: “Elevation 5,280 feet above sea level.” Since 1970, only one team (the Steelers) has more home wins than Denver.

NFL teams can typically throw away half of their road games as losses and have a very successful season. The mile high challenge which became the mile high beat down can be viewed as one of those ‘throw away’ games. In addition to the high altitude burden, east coast teams playing night games out west have a dismal record. As the west teams body clock kicks in, the east coast teams feel it is time to go to sleep.

The defenses getting gassed (see Ravens and Redskins) after the starters have played maybe 3 quarters in the preseason will not be a continuing occurrence. They will build stamina as the season progresses. The Ravens defenders were not gassed in the Denver playoff game even into overtime. In last week's game, the Ravens defense was outstanding in the first half before the attitude, heat and lack of stamina drained their energy throughout the second half. Play that game again in the Denver cold with maximum endurance and stamina built throughout the season and the first half will carry over into the 4th quarter and OT if necessary.

It is not an attitude adjustment the Ravens need right now, it is an altitude adjustment. The air was thin in Denver but it will be thick with desire, intensity and pride on Sunday. The Championship banner will rise as will the team’s energy and passion to eliminate the taste of week one’s embarrassment from their mouths. John Harbaugh stated he wanted his team to both be ticked off and want to move on from the last defeat.

What a change in altitude we will experience on Sunday. The Ravens home field is over 5,200 feet lower than Denver. They have their own home field advantage. Over the past decade, only one team (the Patriots) has a better home record than the Ravens. There will be a different altitude and attitude on Sunday. The recipient of Harbaugh’s ticked off team will be the Cleveland Browns, the NFL’s ‘cure all’ for many years. Breathe more oxygen and play the Browns. It is just what the doctor ordered.

#2 OriginalColtsFan

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 09:00 AM

The Browns suck. It proves nothing to beat the Browns. It's expected. The only thing that would have any affect would be if the Ravens lose to the Browns. Then you'd see an altitude adjustment alright...the already volatile season would blow sky high.

#3 weird-O

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 10:42 AM

wasn't it expected that the ravens would lose in Denver?

I know I expected it to happen.

#4 OriginalColtsFan

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 10:47 AM

wasn't it expected that the ravens would lose in Denver?

I know I expected it to happen.

They were certainly underdogs in Vegas, that's for sure. But I thought folks were all buying into the "Denver Hype". I honestly thought the Ravens would go in there prepared and come away with an upset victory. And the first half showed every indication that that was possible. The injuries to Oher and Jones certainly hurt, but that was on offense. I thought after watching Pees patch together a make shift defense last year (with Webb out, and Lewis out, etc.) that he was on top of his game. He was definitely not on top of his game in Denver. And with all of the other events that took place, it was just too much to overcome. Some of the things that happened couldn't be helped; others could. But taken all together it was a classic case of whatever could go wrong did go wrong in the 2nd half.

#5 Steveg85321

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 11:42 AM

I think the altitude premise is valid, but only part of the problem for the Ravens' defense. They certainly were huffing, puffing and dragging their butts in the second half, but the biggest problem was Peyton Manning. That guy has owned the Ravens for about ten years, with one notable exception. The Ravens' defense has yet to work out the kinks of playing together with all the new guys, and while Ray and Ed may have lost a step physically, it was pretty hard to fool them, which is one of Manning's great skills. Fortunately there are not many QBs as cerebral and accurate as him, and I'm sure the defense will come together as the weeks come and go. I hesitate to blame Pees for the Denver debacle, but it is on him to make it work going forward.

#6 baltiMOREOandR

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 11:48 AM

I hesitate to blame Pees for the Denver debacle...


I concur. With a group of out of breath, out of energy guys... what adjustments could be made?

You can't blitz more or play man more in the physical condition (via mile high) they were in.

#7 OriginalColtsFan

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 11:53 AM

I concur. With a group of out of breath, out of energy guys... what adjustments could be made?

You can't blitz more or play man more in the physical condition (via mile high) they were in.

In general you can't blitz Peyton; he's too quick. But what you do is disguise the front and where the people are coming from, who's in coverage, etc. Pees did NONE of that. And it's a guarantee for disaster. Furthermore, in the entire first half, he didn't have Webb on Welker; he had Graham. And it clearly wasn't working. He did change that up in the second half, but it should have been that match up from the start. But hey...it's only Ray Lewis saying that, so...

(the part about disguising the fronts and doing everything possible to confuse Manning, rather than play right into his hands.)

If the D had been more efficient and effective, they wouldn't have been so gassed. And I'm tired of hearing the excuse that they were gassed because they were playing at Mile High. They played DOUBLE OVERTIME the last time they were up there, MUCH later in the season, and they played fine. So just stop it with the thin air excuse; it's way too thin.

#8 baltiMOREOandR

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 12:02 PM

In general you can't blitz Peyton; he's too quick. But what you do is disguise the front and where the people are coming from, who's in coverage, etc. Pees did NONE of that. And it's a guarantee for disaster. Furthermore, in the entire first half, he didn't have Webb on Welker; he had Graham. And it clearly wasn't working. He did change that up in the second half, but it should have been that match up from the start. But hey...it's only Ray Lewis saying that, so...


Yep, you cannot play chess with checker pieces (out of energy defenders). Beside Webb on Welker, the 'disguise Peyton' requires guys running up and back and sideways - ENERGY.

As far as Ray Lewis, "the bottom line is you can play chess on a checker board, but you need all the right pieces. That's what you do in this business... but they were gassed and I wasn't there to pump em up."

#9 OriginalColtsFan

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 12:04 PM

Yep, you cannot play chess with checker pieces (out of energy defenders). Beside Webb on Welker, the 'disguise Peyton' requires guys running up and back and sideways - ENERGY.

As far as Ray Lewis, "the bottom line is you can play chess on a checker board, but you need all the right pieces. That's what you do in this business... but they were gassed and I wasn't there to pump em up."

Then would you care to explain, according to your high altitude theory, how the Ravens managed to play into double overtime, late in the season, and not get "gassed"?

Edited by OriginalColtsFan, 11 September 2013 - 12:52 PM.


#10 jessup270

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 04:40 PM

Everything will be different on Sunday. Tens of thousands of men, woman and children will descend upon the Ravens nest clad in purple camouflage, donning purple beads and purple and black face paint. There will be a different feeling in the air from the beating the Ravens took in Denver. In fact, there will be more air available for the Ravens anxious to prove to the football world and their fans they are a team to be reckoned with.

The Ravens opened their quest for another championship season with a spirited first half. They entered the locker room at half time with a 17-14 lead. In the second half, the team ran out of gas or should we say oxygen. The Broncos not so secret weapon greats visiting teams on a sign above the locker room that reads: “Elevation 5,280 feet above sea level.” Since 1970, only one team (the Steelers) has more home wins than Denver.

NFL teams can typically throw away half of their road games as losses and have a very successful season. The mile high challenge which became the mile high beat down can be viewed as one of those ‘throw away’ games. In addition to the high altitude burden, east coast teams playing night games out west have a dismal record. As the west teams body clock kicks in, the east coast teams feel it is time to go to sleep.

The defenses getting gassed (see Ravens and Redskins) after the starters have played maybe 3 quarters in the preseason will not be a continuing occurrence. They will build stamina as the season progresses. The Ravens defenders were not gassed in the Denver playoff game even into overtime. In last week's game, the Ravens defense was outstanding in the first half before the attitude, heat and lack of stamina drained their energy throughout the second half. Play that game again in the Denver cold with maximum endurance and stamina built throughout the season and the first half will carry over into the 4th quarter and OT if necessary.

It is not an attitude adjustment the Ravens need right now, it is an altitude adjustment. The air was thin in Denver but it will be thick with desire, intensity and pride on Sunday. The Championship banner will rise as will the team’s energy and passion to eliminate the taste of week one’s embarrassment from their mouths. John Harbaugh stated he wanted his team to both be ticked off and want to move on from the last defeat.

What a change in altitude we will experience on Sunday. The Ravens home field is over 5,200 feet lower than Denver. They have their own home field advantage. Over the past decade, only one team (the Patriots) has a better home record than the Ravens. There will be a different altitude and attitude on Sunday. The recipient of Harbaugh’s ticked off team will be the Cleveland Browns, the NFL’s ‘cure all’ for many years. Breathe more oxygen and play the Browns. It is just what the doctor ordered.


I lived in Denver for 5 years, the altitude theory is a MYTH. Yes, balls fly further in the thin air, but it is not a problem for people to breath at 5,200 feet.

Thousands of senior citizens fly into Denver each day and suffer no respiratory problems at 5200 feet.

Remember professional athletes are some of the best conditioned athletes in the world.

At 9,000 feet you will notice some minor breathing adjustments.

Rocky Mountain Nation Park 60 miles north of Denver has a paved road that travels to a height of 14,000 feet. People get of their vehicles at the eatery there and seem to suffer very little problems. Many walk up a very steep set of steps to see the view from the top of the lookout, at this stop.

#11 OriginalColtsFan

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 04:45 PM

I lived in Denver for 5 years, the altitude theory is a MYTH. Yes, balls fly further in the thin air, but it is not a problem for people to breath at 5,200 feet.

Thousands of senior citizens fly into Denver each day and suffer no respiratory problems at 5200 feet.

Remember professional athletes are some of the best conditioned athletes in the world.

At 9,000 feet you will notice some minor breathing adjustments.

Rocky Mountain Nation Park 60 miles north of Denver has a paved road that travels to a height of 14,000 feet. People get of their vehicles at the eatery there and seem to suffer very little problems. Many walk up a very steep set of steps to see the view from the top of the lookout, at this stop.

Thank you.

(IIRC, there is that one Steelers player, I think, who can't play in Denver because of some health issue, but he's the one notable exception in the entire NFL.)

#12 baltiMOREOandR

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 04:48 PM

Already explained last season's playoff game... they had 17 games under their belt/lungs... stamina.

There are dozens and dozens of athletes who state playing a mile high is different... takes their breath away. Google away and see.

#13 OriginalColtsFan

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 04:59 PM

Already explained last season's playoff game... they had 17 games under their belt/lungs... stamina.

That's absurd. Players are never healthier than the first game. Granted, they haven't had full game contact, but to say that they're in better condition at the end of a full 16 game season is just wrong. By the end of the season they're just all hanging on, especially rookies who have never played that many games in their life. And as jessup pointed out...it's a myth.

#14 Rael

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 07:51 PM

That's absurd. Players are never healthier than the first game. Granted, they haven't had full game contact, but to say that they're in better condition at the end of a full 16 game season is just wrong. By the end of the season they're just all hanging on, especially rookies who have never played that many games in their life. And as jessup pointed out...it's a myth.


Not sure about that. The season is a grind, I'm sure. However, those that make it through uninjured are probably in better cardio and respiratory shape at the end of the year. Aching muscles? Of course. Better able to handle thin air? Probably.

#15 OriginalColtsFan

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 08:17 PM

Not sure about that. The season is a grind, I'm sure. However, those that make it through uninjured are probably in better cardio and respiratory shape at the end of the year. Aching muscles? Of course. Better able to handle thin air? Probably.

Again. See jessup's post. The "thin air" is a myth.

#16 cprenegade

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 11:53 PM

I love the way the thin air of Denver plays into anything anyone wants it to be. Before last years playoff game, the thin air was overrated and something both teams had to deal with. After that game there was no talk of thin air. That was in near zero degree temps. Now, on a hot September night, the thin air got to the defense. A defense, mind you, that is supposedly younger and more athletic than last years older defense playing in it's 18th week of football. Let's just stop pretending and say it like it was. The defense got schooled last Thursday by a much better offense. I expect the Ravens to beat the Browns on Sunday, and probably somewhat easily. But while that will even the record at 1-1, it won't erase the deficiencies the defense showed against the Broncos. Houston the next week might prove a bit of a better comparison.

#17 West Chester Raven

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 05:11 AM

The Browns suck. It proves nothing to beat the Browns. It's expected. The only thing that would have any affect would be if the Ravens lose to the Browns. Then you'd see an altitude adjustment alright...the already volatile season would blow sky high.


OCF - good morning. We agree on this. My thoughts exactly when I read this post. The Broncos game was a real test against another highly regarded team.

Beating the Browns at home doesn't mean as much as losing to the Broncos the way they lost.

You have to play the games on your schedule, but last week was a test and the new look Ravens failed that test miserably.

#18 ivanbalt

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 06:02 AM

OCF - good morning. We agree on this. My thoughts exactly when I read this post. The Broncos game was a real test against another highly regarded team.

Beating the Browns at home doesn't mean as much as losing to the Broncos the way they lost.

You have to play the games on your schedule, but last week was a test and the new look Ravens failed that test miserably.


I don't even think the Broncos loss was too big in the long run other than allowing 7 passing TDs. Manning is always a juggernaut in the regular season (and fairly mediocre in the postseason considering his resume). It wasn't the first time the Ravens got blown out by one of his teams (see last year against the Broncos). I think the Houston game week 3 will be the real test.

The Browns game will hopefully help the Ravens regain some self-esteem.

#19 OriginalColtsFan

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 06:14 AM

I love the way the thin air of Denver plays into anything anyone wants it to be. Before last years playoff game, the thin air was overrated and something both teams had to deal with. After that game there was no talk of thin air. That was in near zero degree temps. Now, on a hot September night, the thin air got to the defense. A defense, mind you, that is supposedly younger and more athletic than last years older defense playing in it's 18th week of football. Let's just stop pretending and say it like it was. The defense got schooled last Thursday by a much better offense. I expect the Ravens to beat the Browns on Sunday, and probably somewhat easily. But while that will even the record at 1-1, it won't erase the deficiencies the defense showed against the Broncos. Houston the next week might prove a bit of a better comparison.

This.

#20 baltiMOREOandR

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 06:58 AM

Again. See jessup's post. The "thin air" is a myth.


LOL that OCF deems someone an expert and goes with it. I mean walking some steps and standing there is the same as playing a football game in the NFL.

The guys that actually played there says it is not a myth. Who will you believe, NFL players who play there or jessup?

http://espn.go.com/n...-advantage-no-5

The Mile High thing is no myth.

"Oh, yeah," Bailey said. "In an up-tempo game, the altitude wears you out. Nobody coming in here is used to it."

The human body performs at maximum efficiency in sea-level air, where the concentration of oxygen is 20.9 percent and fully saturates the hemoglobin in the blood. The higher you climb, the lower that number gets.

"It's real," insisted former Patriots linebacker Tedy Bruschi. "It affects you. The oxygen you're breathing into your muscles isn't the same. You feel yourself gasping."

"You could see the fatigue," Bailey said of the Steelers. "Peyton has really opened up our offense. If we're in a shootout, it definitely works in our favor."




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