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Sammy Stewart's life after prison


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#1 Baltimatt

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 09:33 AM

But no one fell as fast as Stewart, the affable "Throwin' Swannanoan" from western North Carolina. He started using crack cocaine shortly after he left baseball in 1987, and the drug dominated his life for the better part of 20 years. Stewart pawned his most cherished belongings, ruined his relationships with his children and, finally, landed in a North Carolina prison for six years and eight months.

 

"He lost everything," says his older sister, Linda Banks. But Stewart did not let bitterness consume him. He embraced incarceration for what it was — his last, best chance.

 


Read more: http://www.baltimore...y#ixzz2ivtPWcmD

 

I wish him well.  

 

His now-girlfriend actually moved from Seattle to North Carolina to be near him while he was still in prison.  I hope her faith in him is rewarded.


Dieser Weg wird kein leichter sein; dieser Weg wird steinig und schwer.
Nicht mit vielen wirst du dir einig sein, doch dieses Leben bietet so viel mehr. --Xavier Naidoo

#2 weird-O

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 10:52 AM

there was something in the article that I thought was strange. They interviewed a guy who has been paying Sammy to be a pitching coach for his son. the odd thing is this. the father talked about how he realized there was a degree of risk in leaving his son with Sammy while they worked on mechanics. 

 

I don't understand why would that he a concern? he wasn't in jail for inappropriate behavior with children. they're in a public place for an hour or so.

 

from time to time, addictions have been a topic of discussion around here. I'm blessed that I don't have that type of personality, or chemical make up. but previous conversations on this board have provided real insight into the problems of addiction. He has a tough journey ahead of him. as he begins to build a new life, with new relationships, money and opportunity, he'll have the resources to scratch that itch. I hope he can stay strong.

 

it will probably take a track record of staying clean and responsible before any MLB club gives him a job. 


"There are three kinds of lies: lies, damn lies, and statistics." - Benjamin Disraeli

#3 Rael

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 05:49 PM

there was something in the article that I thought was strange. They interviewed a guy who has been paying Sammy to be a pitching coach for his son. the odd thing is this. the father talked about how he realized there was a degree of risk in leaving his son with Sammy while they worked on mechanics. 

 

I don't understand why would that he a concern? he wasn't in jail for inappropriate behavior with children. they're in a public place for an hour or so.

 

I think the risk is more of a financial risk (small though it may be)., He could be unreliable, show up blitzed and be worthless, etc.


Pessimism is just an ugly word for 'pattern recognition'.

#4 weird-O

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 10:05 AM

that's a good point


"There are three kinds of lies: lies, damn lies, and statistics." - Benjamin Disraeli

#5 jchaupt18

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 03:39 PM

Childs Walker, whose byline has too seldom appeared on the Sun's Sports pages, presented us with a masterly written article on the ups and downs of Sammy Stewart' life. An outstanding pitcher for the O's he was saddled, as a youngster,  with a mother who lost a leg in an accident and a father who lost an arm. Later 2 children with cystic fibrosis...what a load for a young guy. Childs carefully gave us the story without furnishing his own take on that, leaving it up to us to understand how Sammy's life took the course that it did.

We like to think of having the life of a well-paid athlete but don't realize how abnormal life can sometimes be outside of Sport. I wish Sammy the best of luck.

I also hope that members of his Oriole family will give him all their support. Childs mentions that Sammy would like to have the opportuniy to get back into professional baseball. I HOPe someone in the Oriole organization sees fit to give him a call to just chat about that.



#6 ziptop

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 06:47 AM

Wasn't it Sammy Stewart who ran onto the field out of the bullpen with a couple other cohorts, maybe Tippy Martinez and Lenn Sakata? Was it at the Fantastic Fans Night? I remember the incident, but I don't remember when. It could have been a seventh inning stretch. And I think they may have been carrying play musical instruments.






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