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#1 sparky1

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 11:31 AM

it looks like DC is trying to get a handle on its transfer problem. I am not sure how big a deal it is in MD, but I hope it tapers off if only for parities sake. 

 

http://www.washingto...3-11e3-801f-1f90bf692c9b_story.html



#2 Outside Looking In

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 11:38 AM

It is big in MD as well. I have talked about this on many occasions. It is wrong and they should not let it happen. Special transfer requests, transferring mid season to play other sports, etc. It is terrible and sets a bad example of a win at all cost attitude.



#3 GREYHOUND ALUM

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 11:52 AM

Transfers are common in Maryland but it's no where near as bad as the DC area. It's like the wild Wild West there and has been for a very long time. And not just the public league, the WCAC is also open season when it come to transfers. Maryland is catching up(I'm hearing about a lot of transfer action already on the area) but has a ways to go. I don't mind certain transfers because I don't know every kids situation. So who am I to judge some family's decision? But I also am not a proponent of strictly sports related transfers. So I'm torn on the subject.

#4 RM7

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 11:59 AM

Transfers are common in Maryland but it's no where near as bad as the DC area. It's like the wild Wild West there and has been for a very long time. And not just the public league, the WCAC is also open season when it come to transfers. Maryland is catching up(I'm hearing about a lot of transfer action already on the area) but has a ways to go. I don't mind certain transfers because I don't know every kids situation. So who am I to judge some family's decision? But I also am not a proponent of strictly sports related transfers. So I'm torn on the subject.

 

Are the two freshman Bucs going to get in.



#5 GREYHOUND ALUM

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 12:22 PM

Are the two freshman Bucs going to get in.


Haven't heard much about it lately. I'm hearing a lot about movement from the WCAC.

#6 First_Down

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 12:41 PM

Transfers are common in Maryland but it's no where near as bad as the DC area. It's like the wild Wild West there and has been for a very long time. And not just the public league, the WCAC is also open season when it come to transfers. Maryland is catching up(I'm hearing about a lot of transfer action already on the area) but has a ways to go. I don't mind certain transfers because I don't know every kids situation. So who am I to judge some family's decision? But I also am not a proponent of strictly sports related transfers. So I'm torn on the subject.

 

I was all against any sports transfers until I became aquainted with a kid who was going to be back-up to the great Joe Haden at Friendly.  Needless to say, that kid I come to know would have never seen relevant game time looking to beat out Joe Haden.  However, that kid was a damn good player himself to not have much of chance to show what he could do at Friendly.  Did I mention All-World Lamaar Thomas (Ohio State - New Mexico ) and state sprint champion at the time was on the other side of the field with Joe Haden?  So for purely football reasons, the kid I knew transfered.  The bottom line is that kid was a standout player were he transfered and ended up at Pitt on a schooly.  So I ain't in on telling anyone what they should or shouldn't do from my perspective of pure ignorance.



#7 harcohorns

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 12:51 PM

Its basically NCAA practices filtering into High School.. The allure of fame and big money etc..is just too much...  

 

You don't have to look any further than the grad rates of big time NCAA football and basketball programs to understand..  Education is not the goal and not necessary..

 

You need just enough education to qualify and get that scholly then roll the dice on the NFL or NBA..    Sure everyone talks about academics but lets be real its all talk...  Sure many do take advantage of the free education and go on to great things in life (like raise a family)   and many also don't.. Unfortunately the ones who don't come from backgrounds where athletics were put ahead of academics and that continues in college and if thy don't make the "league" they got nothing!   Its a shame too because some of them may have had great minds and could have done things to change world but we will never know... 

 

Fame and Fortune is more important than humanity and striving to make the world a better place these days..  Its funny I remember a time when being an Astronaut  or President were the thing kids dreamed about... 



#8 harcohorns

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 12:55 PM

 


Edited by harcohorns, 06 December 2013 - 09:32 AM.


#9 mark327

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 08:52 AM

Just curious , what is anyone's opinion on transferring through 4 different private high schools in md/dc  in a 3 year period sound like ? 


Edited by mark327, 06 December 2013 - 09:02 AM.


#10 dunkone

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 09:26 AM

unless things have changed...transfers within the wcac still have to sit a yr don't they?



#11 mark327

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 09:38 AM

yes, just like the MIAA . The sneaky way of  getting by this until you get what you want is to go from MIAA  to WCAC to MIAA going to different schools in those systems . Thus not having to sit out a year.  I want to know how people on this board  feel about this . Long time reader first time poster



#12 Outside Looking In

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 09:53 AM

yes, just like the MIAA . The sneaky way of  getting by this until you get what you want is to go from MIAA  to WCAC to MIAA going to different schools in those systems . Thus not having to sit out a year.  I want to know how people on this board  feel about this . Long time reader first time poster

It is a joke and the parents are completely to blame.



#13 sparky1

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 10:23 AM

I agree it is a joke and the parents are to blame. As  a parent myself i can not imagine having to acclimate my son to four different private schools in four years. Yikes!



#14 mop

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 10:36 AM

People transfer their kids out of private schools for a lot of reasons some of which are economic, academic and athletic.

  • Parents lose jobs or get promotions/new jobs that change their financial position and make a transfer necessary or affordable.
  • Kids struggle or aren't challenged and parents want a different learning environment. 
  • Athletic programs change (new coach, new system) and the new situation isn't a good match for the kid.

There are wacko parents who transfer their sons every year...these people are absolutely crazy. There are other parents who should transfer their kids (school is not a good match for the kid based on reasons 1-3 above) but don't because of laziness or some misguided sense of loyalty. IMHO, both sets of parents are failing their kids. 

 

If I'm a parent who's paying full tuition to an educational vendor (yes, that what private schools are), I really don't care what other people (coaches, administrators, parents, etc.) think about a family's decision to transfer their kid from one school to another. Its all about the kid's best interests. Parents should weigh the considerable psychologial/social baggage that's part of every transfer versus the economic, academic or athletic benefits of a school change.  



#15 Outside Looking In

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 12:01 PM

People transfer their kids out of private schools for a lot of reasons some of which are economic, academic and athletic.

  • Parents lose jobs or get promotions/new jobs that change their financial position and make a transfer necessary or affordable.
  • Kids struggle or aren't challenged and parents want a different learning environment. 
  • Athletic programs change (new coach, new system) and the new situation isn't a good match for the kid.

There are wacko parents who transfer their sons every year...these people are absolutely crazy. There are other parents who should transfer their kids (school is not a good match for the kid based on reasons 1-3 above) but don't because of laziness or some misguided sense of loyalty. IMHO, both sets of parents are failing their kids. 

 

If I'm a parent who's paying full tuition to an educational vendor (yes, that what private schools are), I really don't care what other people (coaches, administrators, parents, etc.) think about a family's decision to transfer their kid from one school to another. Its all about the kid's best interests. Parents should weigh the considerable psychologial/social baggage that's part of every transfer versus the economic, academic or athletic benefits of a school change.  

ImO #3 should never be an option. School is academics first and foremost. If a parent loses a job, or moves or kids are not being ACADEMICALLY challenged than I agree. But kids should never, ever transfer becasue of athletic reasons. What kind of message is that sending about priorities.  Athletics are a privilege, not a right and should not dictate transferring. But again, how can that be proven that a kid is doing it strictly for athletic reasons? We know it happens but parents will always say it is for another reason.



#16 DayWalker

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 12:42 PM

ImO #3 should never be an option. School is academics first and foremost. If a parent loses a job, or moves or kids are not being ACADEMICALLY challenged than I agree. But kids should never, ever transfer becasue of athletic reasons. What kind of message is that sending about priorities.  Athletics are a privilege, not a right and should not dictate transferring. But again, how can that be proven that a kid is doing it strictly for athletic reasons? We know it happens but parents will always say it is for another reason.

 

If #3 is an option for the school and coaches, then why not for student-athletes!!!!

 

I hate in the NCAA ranks when coaches can come and go essentially as the adminstration or coaches see fit yet the student-athlete is stuck.  Moreover, a new coach can come in and just decide who will not be back and it's a done deal.

 

But back to high school, if a student can legally transfer, what's the problem??????  It's LEGAL -- allowed.



#17 Outside Looking In

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 12:56 PM

If #3 is an option for the school and coaches, then why not for student-athletes!!!!

 

I hate in the NCAA ranks when coaches can come and go essentially as the adminstration or coaches see fit yet the student-athlete is stuck.  Moreover, a new coach can come in and just decide who will not be back and it's a done deal.

 

But back to high school, if a student can legally transfer, what's the problem??????  It's LEGAL -- allowed.

Because in college it is a business model, a profit motive. Coaches are hired as coaches and nothing else. Students go to college for academics first and if privileged enough to also play sports. You said it, student-athletes, not athlete-students.

 

And there are many things that are legal but that does not mean they are right.



#18 mop

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 02:34 PM

ImO #3 should never be an option. School is academics first and foremost. If a parent loses a job, or moves or kids are not being ACADEMICALLY challenged than I agree. But kids should never, ever transfer becasue of athletic reasons. What kind of message is that sending about priorities.  Athletics are a privilege, not a right and should not dictate transferring. But again, how can that be proven that a kid is doing it strictly for athletic reasons? We know it happens but parents will always say it is for another reason.

 

Athletics are a privilege but can sometimes be the ticket to a great education (top tier academic school or a full scholarship). Consider these two situations:

 

Scenario One: Your son, who happens to be an A student at a very good school, is a (bona fide: not a parent's opinion but from unbiased trustworthy sources) Division One caliber pocket QB. He's poised to start his sophomore year, when the school fires the existing coach who puts in a single wing or veer offense. Your son can go to any high school he wants to (remember he has straight As) but will most likely only get recruited by the top football schools (let's say he wants to go to either Stanford or Notre Dame for giggles) if he plays in a traditional pro style or spread offense. Answer: Transfer   

 

Scenario Two: All of the same assumptions as Scenario One except the coach isn't fired and he runs a pro style/spread offense. Your son is the number one rated rising sophomore QB in the state but now a better QB, who also happens to be a sophomore transfers into your School and takes your son's spot. Do you throw away your son's potential full scholarship to a great academic program or do you transfer him into a School where you're 100% confident he'll start. Remember that the scholarship to Stanford/Notre Dame is equal to $250M in after tax dollars before you answer. Answer: Transfer  

 

The moral of this post is every situation has to be looked at individually. Unless your son is a can't miss first round draft pick, athletics should be used to maximize a student athlete's academic experience and long term financial well being.

 

Here's a related dilemna, if you don't qualify for financial aid and your son is accepted at Yale, Princeton, Stanford, Notre Dame and Duke and the latter three are all offering full rides and you're confident your son will be allowed to take a real major (no basket weaving), wouldn't you pick the full ride?


Edited by mop, 06 December 2013 - 02:35 PM.


#19 Outside Looking In

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 02:52 PM

Athletics are a privilege but can sometimes be the ticket to a great education (top tier academic school or a full scholarship). Consider these two situations:

 

Scenario One: Your son, who happens to be an A student at a very good school, is a (bona fide: not a parent's opinion but from unbiased trustworthy sources) Division One caliber pocket QB. He's poised to start his sophomore year, when the school fires the existing coach who puts in a single wing or veer offense. Your son can go to any high school he wants to (remember he has straight As) but will most likely only get recruited by the top football schools (let's say he wants to go to either Stanford or Notre Dame for giggles) if he plays in a traditional pro style or spread offense. Answer: Transfer   

 

Scenario Two: All of the same assumptions as Scenario One except the coach isn't fired and he runs a pro style/spread offense. Your son is the number one rated rising sophomore QB in the state but now a better QB, who also happens to be a sophomore transfers into your School and takes your son's spot. Do you throw away your son's potential full scholarship to a great academic program or do you transfer him into a School where you're 100% confident he'll start. Remember that the scholarship to Stanford/Notre Dame is equal to $250M in after tax dollars before you answer. Answer: Transfer  

 

The moral of this post is every situation has to be looked at individually. Unless your son is a can't miss first round draft pick, athletics should be used to maximize a student athlete's academic experience and long term financial well being.

 

Here's a related dilemna, if you don't qualify for financial aid and your son is accepted at Yale, Princeton, Stanford, Notre Dame and Duke and the latter three are all offering full rides and you're confident your son will be allowed to take a real major (no basket weaving), wouldn't you pick the full ride?

Scenario 1: Pick a school for academics not styles of football. My point being, you never know when a coach can go, does that mean a student always leave when a diff style comes in? So if that Sophomore transfers to a school that has a pro-style offense and plays there as a junior and then that coach leaves, should the student transfer again if the new coach's style didnt fit them? Pick a school for academics and comfort, not sports.

 

Scenario 2: Again, stay and work harder. Play a different position. How can you guarnatee that if you transfer that you will start and be better than the QB they have there? Again, pick a school for academics and comfort and not sports.

 

Related Dilemma: If those schools have accepted you, it is pretty safe to say that almost all colleges would. Go to a college that has great academics and is more affordable. If they happen to have football, have at it.



#20 DayWalker

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 03:22 PM

Because in college it is a business model, a profit motive. Coaches are hired as coaches and nothing else. Students go to college for academics first and if privileged enough to also play sports. You said it, student-athletes, not athlete-students.

 

And there are many things that are legal but that does not mean they are right.

 

Yep, as I said it, student-athlete.  Well, student-athletes are just that, students first and athletes second.  That is, until another coaching staff comes on board and the student-athletes who services are no longer needed, then it's althlete or even employee first and student becomes a non-factor.  Another thing that is legal but not right wouldn't you say?






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