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Sills commits to WVU


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#1 harcohorns

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 03:14 PM

as many predicted...



#2 GREYHOUND ALUM

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 03:21 PM

Not sure this is the right place for him. Should be interesting to see the battle between him and Crest with Crest having a little head start on him.

#3 harcohorns

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 03:28 PM

Not sure this is the right place for him. Should be interesting to see the battle between him and Crest with Crest having a little head start on him.

 

Defintelty will be interesting to follow that battle.. 

 

As an interesting anecdote.. Crest and Sills battled for top QB a few years back when Crest came up to Red Lion when Red Lion hosted an NUC camp/Combine there..  Sills got the hardware but many in the Crest camp felt Crest got jobbed.  Actually he kind of did as somehow Sills got all his guys on his 7on7 team and were able to go out and run their hudlle offense and of course easily won the 7on7 portion of the camp.everyone else was drawing plays up in the dirt...  :P


Edited by harcohorns, 16 July 2014 - 03:41 PM.


#4 First_Down

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 04:26 PM

So what happened with all that USC talk for so many years?



#5 harcohorns

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 04:31 PM

So what happened with all that USC talk for so many years?

 

Lane Kiffen got fired.. New coach secured a commit from the #2 rated 2015  QB ( Rickey Town) so they went a different direction on Sills.. just part of the "business" of college recruiting..



#6 harcohorns

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 06:21 PM

From everything I am reading out there in twitter and blog world the WVU faithful are very psyched on landing him.   I know WVU was one of the schools that was always around Red Lion in the early days and were very high on him then.. In fact they took their shots even though he was committed to USC..   Good for David good for WVU fans...  They seem excited anyway... 



#7 sparky1

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 10:06 PM

Typical result. What in the world would an 8th grader know about what college he will want to attend (quality to get into). It should be no surprise that the 8th grade pipe dream/hype has blown up. I only hope the coaches and parents stop with this nonsense. Lacrosse parents I am looking at you.



#8 DayWalker

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 05:45 AM

It's was just an offer spark, like a college 529 plan and some of those are done even before a kid is born.  So it's no big deal to make offers or even commit.  We all know nothing is legally binding on either party.  I have a niece who is in a sorority and she works with a teen puesdo-chapter of her organization with middle schools girls with the ultimate goal of having them to attend college and to become *************** .  There is nothing wrong with getting in there early and nothing wrong with dreams.

 

And you have no call to look at any lacrosse parents for what they do with THEIR kids.  It's 10 o'clock at night.  Do you know where / what YOUR childs are doing, as the saying goes?  In other words, mind your own puckin' business!!!

 

Yours truly,

Blade


Edited by DayWalker, 17 July 2014 - 05:49 AM.


#9 sparky1

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 06:21 AM

Day, there is nothing wrong with dreams, I would hope that every kid dreams of going to college. But I think it is wrong to sugar coat the fact that an 8th grader has four years of work in high school ahead of them before college. For athletes early "decision" distorts the process and gives kids the false impression that there is a perfect school for them and they have to decide now. . .. a the age most of them can't even get into a R movie or have completed a single high school class. It reduces them to nothing more than Athletic gambles that a coach is lining up as longshots. . . . I am not certain, but I think it is probably correct that the average tenure of a D1 coach is going to be short enough that the athlete (not young adult) will be playing for someone else when crunch time comes. 



#10 gillytech

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 08:50 AM

Sparky is right - the lacrosse situation is completely out of hand and isn't helping the schools or student athletes.  The vast majority of high school and college coaches want to change the current set up and are pushing to do so.



#11 mop

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 10:19 AM

Sparky may be right but the reality is if you have high school athletes who want to play D1, you have to play the game. ADs and HCs who scoff at early recruiting and refuse to participate in the process only hurt their student/athletes. Stop being sanctimonious and help your kids get into the best schools (especially if they're looking to sports to help them get into the best academic school possible). I don't have a problem with anyone fighting the current early recruiting trend but don't hurt your own kids by refusing to advocate for them!

 

ADs and HCs who refuse to help develop their kids in the off season and assist them in getting into the best academic school should be relieved of their duties. Too many sanctimonius, lazy, selfish curmudgeons in the athletic ranks for my liking. You're getting paid to mentor and advance young student athetes: Do your job!!



#12 gillytech

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 10:39 AM

I'm not aware of any ADs or HCs that are refusing to participate in the current process.  They just want to change the process because it is counterproductive.  I believe every MIAA school is currently playing along with the early commitment game.



#13 DayWalker

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 12:36 PM

Day, there is nothing wrong with dreams, I would hope that every kid dreams of going to college. But I think it is wrong to sugar coat the fact that an 8th grader has four years of work in high school ahead of them before college. For athletes early "decision" distorts the process and gives kids the false impression that there is a perfect school for them and they have to decide now. . .. a the age most of them can't even get into a R movie or have completed a single high school class. It reduces them to nothing more than Athletic gambles that a coach is lining up as longshots. . . . I am not certain, but I think it is probably correct that the average tenure of a D1 coach is going to be short enough that the athlete (not young adult) will be playing for someone else when crunch time comes. 

 

What sugar coat of an 8th-grader are you talking about Spark!!!!  It wasn't some idle 8th-grader who caught the attention of the then USC coach but a promising 8th-grader who the USC coach felt was worthy to offer.  An "offer" spark!  Nothing legally binding or we would be talking about something else.  It was just an offer and in instead of seeing it as more even motivation for the Sills kid, you see it as some great bait and let down proporsition.  All the banter of false impression and perfect school and decision on the spot is pure hogwash.  Kids who get and accept offers and attend schools are not going to their perfectly selected school but rather a school who offered based on the school's need and the kid accepted.  What perfect school are you talking about?  Parents can and should keep their youngsters in perspective about those issues of false impression, the perfect school, etc.  Damn near every youngster out there wants to be the next LeBron, or RGIII, or Lil Wayne RAPPER or whatever.  Not making an offer does nothing to thwart what childs want to be later in life.  In the Sills case, that 8th-grader obviously had some demonstrative skills and he obviously perfers the game and there is absolutely nothing to indicate that he is doing something that he DOESN'T want to do.  So what's so fundamentally wrong with the offer!!!  Now it didn't work out at USC but so many of them don't work out as planned; even those given to senior 18 / 19 year of age, experienced, and polished kids.

 

The age Sills received his offer probably about the age many tennis schoolers get offers and those athletes are usually done about the age of Sills right now, washed-up at 20, relatively speaking.

 

Spark, there is no gamble with a school offering and a kid accepting.  No ante was placed on the table and certainly no one was legally committed.  Both just walked away.  A kid can get an offer his senior year and accept it and enroll in the school.  And that doesn't gaurantee that coach or that kid would be around at the school the following season so I just don't understand your comment about the short stay of coaches who offer early.  24% of those who accept offers are not around the following year.

 

Spark, the Sills offer is an exception, not the norm, so take it for what it was worth; NOTHIN'  No Harm; No Foul!


Edited by DayWalker, 17 July 2014 - 01:20 PM.


#14 mop

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 01:01 PM

I'm not aware of any ADs or HCs that are refusing to participate in the current process.  They just want to change the process because it is counterproductive.  I believe every MIAA school is currently playing along with the early commitment game.

Unfortunately you're dead wrong on this point. If you search among the football teams tied for last place or the lacrosse teams who didn't make the playoffs this year, you will find the culprits.



#15 gillytech

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 02:23 PM

I can't imagine why they wouldn't play the game or how they could prevent their athletes from committing to a school, but I'll defer to you



#16 mop

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 02:46 PM

I can't imagine why they wouldn't play the game or how they could prevent their athletes from committing to a school, but I'll defer to you

I didn't say they prevent athletes from committing early did I: what they do is the opposite, namely nothing: HCs (supposedly under the direction of their ADs) have to submit selective camp nominations: they don't, remember, they're supposed to be advocates for their players. Not turning in nominations, failing to return a college coach's call or not passing on a strong indication of interest to an underclassman is a tantamount to a boycott of the process. When you bring it to the ADs attention and he tells you early recruiting is a "pox" on high school athletics and interacting with colleges is up to the HC, you know who's leading the charge.

 

It reminds me of my brother's (captain of his high school team and a "yes sir" type of kid) experience in high school over 30 years ago. When he showed up at his college as a recruited football player, the coach wanted to know why his coach (who happened to be the college counsler as well) failed to send his football tapes (before HUDL). To quote the coach directly, thank God we saw you live while scouting another player and also saw you on film from other school otherwise we wouldn't have admitted you.



#17 RM7

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 03:22 PM

What sugar coat of an 8th-grader are you talking about Spark!!!!  It wasn't some idle 8th-grader who caught the attention of the then USC coach but a promising 8th-grader who the USC coach felt was worthy to offer.  An "offer" spark!  Nothing legally binding or we would be talking about something else.  It was just an offer and in instead of seeing it as more even motivation for the Sills kid, you see it as some great bait and let down proporsition.  All the banter of false impression and perfect school and decision on the spot is pure hogwash.  Kids who get and accept offers and attend schools are not going to their perfectly selected school but rather a school who offered based on the school's need and the kid accepted.  What perfect school are you talking about?  Parents can and should keep their youngsters in perspective about those issues of false impression, the perfect school, etc.  Damn near every youngster out there wants to be the next LeBron, or RGIII, or Lil Wayne RAPPER or whatever.  Not making an offer does nothing to thwart what childs want to be later in life.  In the Sills case, that 8th-grader obviously had some demonstrative skills and he obviously perfers the game and there is absolutely nothing to indicate that he is doing something that he DOESN'T want to do.  So what's so fundamentally wrong with the offer!!!  Now it didn't work out at USC but so many of them don't work out as planned; even those given to senior 18 / 19 year of age, experienced, and polished kids.

 

The age Sills received his offer probably about the age many tennis schoolers get offers and those athletes are usually done about the age of Sills right now, washed-up at 20, relatively speaking.

 

Spark, there is no gamble with a school offering and a kid accepting.  No ante was placed on the table and certainly no one was legally committed.  Both just walked away.  A kid can get an offer his senior year and accept it and enroll in the school.  And that doesn't gaurantee that coach or that kid would be around at the school the following season so I just don't understand your comment about the short stay of coaches who offer early.  24% of those who accept offers are not around the following year.

 

Spark, the Sills offer is an exception, not the norm, so take it for what it was worth; NOTHIN'  No Harm; No Foul!

 

  The thing with Sills I think it was more his father’s dream .  I mean what dad flies his team’s middle school team up and down the east coast to play football?  Think in 4th grade he started flying out to Cal to work with the QB whisperer and also so he could snuggle up with USC.  His dad built Red Lion and ECA so he could promote his son. 

 

  I don’t really think at these lengths it’s a dream any more but demanded, like those parents on the HBO special.   There’s a couple around here to that have over 10 screen names on sites to promote their kid over and over again.  Feel really bad for these kids who have parents that put that kind of pressure on them.   It’s hard enough to raise kids these days with all the temptations and distractions out there.  It's gotta be hard for a kid to look at his or her parent and view them also as someone who's looking for a return on there time and investment.  


Edited by RM7, 17 July 2014 - 03:24 PM.


#18 gillytech

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 03:23 PM

Thanks for clarifying.  I got it now.  I can't for the life of me understand why any AD or HC would screw their kids like that just to prove a point though.  That's ridiculous.



#19 sparky1

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 10:02 PM

What sugar coat of an 8th-grader are you talking about Spark!!!!  It wasn't some idle 8th-grader who caught the attention of the then USC coach but a promising 8th-grader who the USC coach felt was worthy to offer.  An "offer" spark!  Nothing legally binding or we would be talking about something else.  It was just an offer and in instead of seeing it as more even motivation for the Sills kid, you see it as some great bait and let down proporsition.  All the banter of false impression and perfect school and decision on the spot is pure hogwash.  Kids who get and accept offers and attend schools are not going to their perfectly selected school but rather a school who offered based on the school's need and the kid accepted.  What perfect school are you talking about?  Parents can and should keep their youngsters in perspective about those issues of false impression, the perfect school, etc.  Damn near every youngster out there wants to be the next LeBron, or RGIII, or Lil Wayne RAPPER or whatever.  Not making an offer does nothing to thwart what childs want to be later in life.  In the Sills case, that 8th-grader obviously had some demonstrative skills and he obviously perfers the game and there is absolutely nothing to indicate that he is doing something that he DOESN'T want to do.  So what's so fundamentally wrong with the offer!!!  Now it didn't work out at USC but so many of them don't work out as planned; even those given to senior 18 / 19 year of age, experienced, and polished kids.

 

The age Sills received his offer probably about the age many tennis schoolers get offers and those athletes are usually done about the age of Sills right now, washed-up at 20, relatively speaking.

 

Spark, there is no gamble with a school offering and a kid accepting.  No ante was placed on the table and certainly no one was legally committed.  Both just walked away.  A kid can get an offer his senior year and accept it and enroll in the school.  And that doesn't gaurantee that coach or that kid would be around at the school the following season so I just don't understand your comment about the short stay of coaches who offer early.  24% of those who accept offers are not around the following year.

 

Spark, the Sills offer is an exception, not the norm, so take it for what it was worth; NOTHIN'  No Harm; No Foul!

 

In football it is perhaps not the norm. In lacrosse at the moment it is becoming more and more common. I think you have addressed my point. If it is non binding on either side why even do it? The coach sure doesn't care. But the athlete, well he has suddenly been validated that he is a college student and athlete. You do not think that will distort his relationship with teammates and coaches in 9th grade? Then of course you are saying that an 8th should give his word to something that he has perhaps no intention of following through with. Perhaps the term commitment has become overused, but if you make one keep it. Whether you are a coach or a player. 

 

I have no problem with tennis players turning pro as soon as they can compete and make a living at it.  . . I don't even have any problem with basketball players doing it. If they think their best chance at a career in sports ends at age 21 that is for them to decide. 

 

The sole purpose of sports at the high school level is as an extracurricular activity designed to teach values that compliment what occurs in the classroom. It may allow a student to attend a college that they may not be able to attend academically or financially. so as an element of adding choice to a decision of which college to go to, yes they do help decide on the the perfect school. Because in the final analysis the perfect school is one that you can attend, and get your value from. 



#20 DayWalker

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 09:13 AM

I really don't think I addressed your point. But why offer if it's non-binding you ask?  Well, perhaps because that's all schools can do by rule.  They can't sign kids until a certain class and date.  They can't do anything binding until the magic signing date by rule.  Thus an offer merely shows heightened interest beyond just a form letter of we are The University of Dummies and we have phootball team.  It's a lot like a college acceptance letter of sorts that says we want you ( you type of talent since that same offer can offered to many others and usually is ).  Do you frown upon colleges sending kids those routine acceptance letters and even early acceptance letters?  Do you frown upon colleges offering prodigy 8th-graders or pre-teens college scholarships?  Of course you don't because you go with the flow that these kids are extra intelligent and worthy.  Well, it's the same for sport in some regard.  USC saw a prodigy in Sills apparently and offered when he was an 8th-grader but by rule nothing can be legally binding until that magic date when the kid signs the intent letter WITH his/her parent.

 

Now I know NOTHING about the lax world so I will bow to whatever you say there.  But let me just say this about all the D1 football recruitment hoopla and what ALL parents should know and understand as one most responsible for their own kids; not coaches, recruiters.  Only about 3% of high school student-athletes receive some form of scholarship.  In a typical high school football game ( on average ), about 50 or so kids start ( both teams ).  That means 1, 2, at most 3 kids will receive a football schooly.  That's on average.  Less than 1% will receive 4-year D1 schoolies.  That's 99% will not!!!  Just think of being tied to something where you know there is a 99% chance it will not happen!

 

So for anyone to receive an offer, actual scholarship, attend the school, and complete IS FANTASTIC and defies the odds!!!!  So if Sills received an offer as a 8th-grader, I ain't hatin' on that.  I ain't hatin' on any kid receiving a sports scholarship in any sport to anywhere.

 

Now I know the issue is USC offering so early.  But I note that WVU, BC, Clemson, Hawaii, MD, Michigan, and VT also offered the kid.  Yet I somehow feel it was all about being wanted since dad appears to have the money to send his kid to any school that would accept him.






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