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workerbee

My Favorite Bassist and what a voice.

75 posts in this topic

Indeed,really never gets the credit he deserves.But being a bass player myself it's good to know just about every bass player I have talked to respects his ability.

Seems there are several low end players on the board.  :)

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No real faves among bassists, but a fave bassist tune is Villa-Lobos's "Little Train," by Niels Henning Orsted-Pedersen, whereon he plays melody & guitarist Philip Catherine plays rhythm. It's a joy & goes on for 10+ min.

That's cool you know about Philip Catherine. Great guitarist. I have an Alphonse Mouson album he plays on. He also plays fretless guitar

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I think that Flea is the best bass player extant.

 

I like John Entwisle, Donald Dunn, Jack Casady and Cliff Burton. 

 

I learned music on a trumpet (b-flat cornet) in the mid 60's) but self taught myself on an electric bass. I wasn't that good, however I had fun trying. 

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I have noted to my friends that there are literally hundreds of outstanding guitarists, but you can count bass players on like one hand. I am a HUGE fan of Jack Casady, and I don't see how you can talk about bass without talking about Jack Bruce. But the godfather of the instrument (talking specifically rock and roll) has to be Thunderfingers:

 

I hope this link works

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 No real faves among bassists, but a fave bassist tune is Villa-Lobos's "Little Train," by Niels Henning Orsted-Pedersen, whereon he plays melody & guitarist Philip Catherine plays rhythm. It's a joy & goes on for 10+ min.

 

I am impressed that you are familiar with Niels Henning Orsted-Pedersen.

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One of my favorite bass lines of all time.

 

The solo in the middle is especially sweet.

Edited by mcorioles

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A master of harmonics.

He seems to be a master at all techniques. Funk is practically silly these days but he turns the whole thing up several notches. Good tapper as well.  My chiming is awful but these videos give a great unhampered view of fingering and execution.

Edited by zenwalk

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I am impressed that you are familiar with Niels Henning Orsted-Pedersen.

Oscar's bass player.

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I have noted to my friends that there are literally hundreds of outstanding guitarists, but you can count bass players on like one hand. I am a HUGE fan of Jack Casady, and I don't see how you can talk about bass without talking about Jack Bruce. But the godfather of the instrument (talking specifically rock and roll) has to be Thunderfingers:

 

I hope this link works

Love Jack Casady and don't really know why he hasn't gotten more credit than he has. He brought jazz to rock which may be why he's often overlooked.  Not many players crossed the line between rock and jazz until Fusion and that wasn't rock so much either. 

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From the 1940's Frank DiNunzi from Lancaster PA... yes I had to look it up.  Hang in or skip to 1:18.  Never messed with stand up, but I have set my Jazz straight up on a table to see what it felt like. 

 

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I am impressed that you are familiar with Niels Henning Orsted-Pedersen.

Me too!

__________________________________________________

James Jamerson

 

James Jamerson, who began his career playing upright bass, adopted the Fender Precision Bass, an electric instrument, in 1962, and played both acoustic and electric bass on many Motown recordings. Jamerson would usually play the acoustic bass for the ensemble take and then dub the same part on electric bass afterward. He was praised for being so precise a player that listeners cannot tell right away that two basses are on the recording.

 

He was the uncredited bassist on most of the Motown Records hits in the 1960s and early 1970s (Motown did not list session musician credits on their releases until 1971) and is now regarded as one of the most influential bass players in modern music history. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000. As a session musician he played on 30 Billboard #1 hits, as well as over 70 R&B #1 hits, more than any other bass player in both categories.

 

In 2011, Jamerson ranked third in The "20 Most Underrated Bass Guitarists" in Paste magazine.

__________________________________________________

 

Other Favorite Bassists:

 

Jooney Booth (McCoy Tyner)

Jack Bruce (Cream)

Ron Carter (Miles Davis)

Stanley Clarke (Return to Forever)

Bootsy Collins (James Brown, Parliament-Funkadelic)

B. B. Dickerson (War)

Roy Estrada (Frank Zappa, Little Feat, Captain Beefheart)

Larry Graham (Sly & The Family Stone, Graham Central Station, Betty Davis)

Sam Jones (Cannonball Adderley, Oscar Peterson, Cedar Walton)

Marcus Miller (Miles Davis, David Sanborn)

Charles Mingus

Jaco Pastorius (Pat Metheny, Weather Report, Joni Mitchell)

John Patitucci (Chick Corea)

Lonnie Plaxico (Wynton Marsalis)

George Porter, Jr. (The Meters)

Mel Schacher (Grand Funk Railroad)

Miroslav Vitous (Weather Report)

Joe Walsh (The James Gang)

Buster Williams (Herbie Hancock)

Victor Wooten (Béla Fleck & The Flecktones)

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Me too!

__________________________________________________

James Jamerson

 

James Jamerson, who began his career playing upright bass, adopted the Fender Precision Bass, an electric instrument, in 1962, and played both acoustic and electric bass on many Motown recordings. Jamerson would usually play the acoustic bass for the ensemble take and then dub the same part on electric bass afterward. He was praised for being so precise a player that listeners cannot tell right away that two basses are on the recording.

 

He was the uncredited bassist on most of the Motown Records hits in the 1960s and early 1970s (Motown did not list session musician credits on their releases until 1971) and is now regarded as one of the most influential bass players in modern music history. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000. As a session musician he played on 30 Billboard #1 hits, as well as over 70 R&B #1 hits, more than any other bass player in both categories.

 

In 2011, Jamerson ranked third in The "20 Most Underrated Bass Guitarists" in Paste magazine.

__________________________________________________

 

Other Favorite Bassists:

 

Jooney Booth (McCoy Tyner)

Jack Bruce (Cream)

Ron Carter (Miles Davis)

Stanley Clarke (Return to Forever)

Bootsy Collins (James Brown, Parliament-Funkadelic)

B. B. Dickerson (War)

Roy Estrada (Frank Zappa, Little Feat, Captain Beefheart)

Larry Graham (Sly & The Family Stone, Graham Central Station, Betty Davis)

Sam Jones (Cannonball Adderley, Oscar Peterson, Cedar Walton)

Marcus Miller (Miles Davis, David Sanborn)

Charles Mingus

Jaco Pastorius (Pat Metheny, Weather Report, Joni Mitchell)

John Patitucci (Chick Corea)

Lonnie Plaxico (Wynton Marsalis)

George Porter, Jr. (The Meters)

Mel Schacher (Grand Funk Railroad)

Miroslav Vitous (Weather Report)

Joe Walsh (The James Gang)

Buster Williams (Herbie Hancock)

Victor Wooten (Béla Fleck & The Flecktones)

 

I would like to add Paul Chambers.

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I would like to add Paul Chambers.

A gross oversight on my part. Paul Chambers & Philly Joe Jones were a Boss rhythm section.

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From the 1940's Frank DiNunzi from Lancaster PA... yes I had to look it up.  Hang in or skip to 1:18.  Never messed with stand up, but I have set my Jazz straight up on a table to see what it felt like. 

 

That's slap bass.  They worked for their money then and they work for their money now.  I have a Fender Jaco fretless and that is exhausting enough to play. A double bass would kill me. 

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That's slap bass.  They worked for their money then and they work for their money now.  I have a Fender Jaco fretless and that is exhausting enough to play. A double bass would kill me. 

I want one (DB) bad if for no other reason to sit in the corner of the living room. Had a Michael Kelly acoustic fiver fret less for awhile.  Just didn't put the time in to play it properly. 

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Ted's on Center St probably has an interior decorator DB.  I see they haven't burned to the ground and are still open.

I probably wouldn't have hung with a fretless either but the neck on mine (carbon) was such a relief from the karpal tunnel inducing neck of my fretted jazz bass knockoff it was hard to go back.  

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I see them on Craigslist all the time. Five hundred to five thousand.  One day...

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