tooldtocare

The end of the Fossil Fuel era is upon us so what are we going to do next-?

116 posts in this topic

2 minutes ago, tooldtocare said:

As important as this topic is I suggest you look into this yourself and not rely on others. You could start by googling:

(A) total world oil reserves

(B) total world annual oil consumption

Divide (B) into (A) = how long we have until it's all gone

(:-

 

 

The problem is we don't know A.  We don't know what B will be in the future.  The point is that 50 years ago, your math predicted we would not have any oil today.  Somehow it is as abundant and cheap as it ever has been.  

Obviously this won't go on forever.  But let's not pretend we have found every drop of oil on earth.  

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On 11/6/2017 at 8:19 AM, tooldtocare said:

In my view this is what is going to happen~~~~~~

 Cars will have a large battery, rectangle in shape imbedded in the bottom of the car.  When you pull up to a filling station you pull up or over a battery exchanger. The automated exchanger removes the discharged batter and inserts a charged one. You are in turn charged for the charging costs.

This will be the future for cars.

(:-

I doubt it, for two reasons.  The battery exchange will have to occur in the same amount it takes to fill up a tank of gas now and the charged battery will have to go as far as the current tank of gas - say 375 miles.  Otherwise, the proponents will need to convince people that spending extra time in a gas (read; battery changing) station is acceptable.  Good luck with that argument.  Changing out that infrastructure to first, build battery replacement stations, as opposed to fuel stations, and adding additional electricity transfer lines to handle the new stations is what will take 50 years to complete.

THe second reason is that electric cars need to be charged with electricity generated somewhere else - using the very oil that is causing the issue.  I admit that it is unlikely there is a one to one change in the amount of fuel used to charge batteries as opposed to filling a tank with fuel, but you’re still using fossil fuels.

Getting to a hydrogen based fuel infrastructure, using fuel cells, will also take a very long to develop and put in place...probably the same 50 years, but at least with hydrogen, were not burning fossil fuel.

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4 minutes ago, MiddleOfTheRoad said:

I doubt it, for two reasons.  The battery exchange will have to occur in the same amount it takes to fill up a tank of gas now and the charged battery will have to go as far as the current tank of gas - say 375 miles.  Otherwise, the proponents will need to convince people that spending extra time in a gas (read; battery changing) station is acceptable.  Good luck with that argument.  Changing out that infrastructure to first, build battery replacement stations, as opposed to fuel stations, and adding additional electricity transfer lines to handle the new stations is what will take 50 years to complete.

THe second reason is that electric cars need to be charged with electricity generated somewhere else - using the very oil that is causing the issue.  I admit that it is unlikely there is a one to one change in the amount of fuel used to charge batteries as opposed to filling a tank with fuel, but you’re still using fossil fuels.

Getting to a hydrogen based fuel infrastructure, using fuel cells, will also take a very long to develop and put in place...probably the same 50 years, but at least with hydrogen, were not burning fossil fuel.

Again with hydrogen, where will you get it?  You have to make it from water.  That takes energy.  So you are back to fossil fuel or nuclear to be practical.  

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27 minutes ago, jdsample said:

Again with hydrogen, where will you get it?  You have to make it from water.  That takes energy.  So you are back to fossil fuel or nuclear to be practical.  

Cracking a hydrogen element out of water takes a LOT of energy - which is precisely why it isn’t used today.  We know it is the cleanest burning mobile capable fuel available to us, but it is, right now, a negative energy source.  Once that piece is resolved, and it will be resolved, then we can use hydrogen powered generators to create clean, ongoing energy streams.  

At least until we get dilithium (sp?) crystals.  :D

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1 hour ago, MiddleOfTheRoad said:

Cracking a hydrogen element out of water takes a LOT of energy - which is precisely why it isn’t used today.  We know it is the cleanest burning mobile capable fuel available to us, but it is, right now, a negative energy source.  Once that piece is resolved, and it will be resolved, then we can use hydrogen powered generators to create clean, ongoing energy streams.  

At least until we get dilithium (sp?) crystals.  :D

It does take a lot of energy.  And it always will.  There is no way around the conservation of energy.  The best you can ever hope for is using slightly more energy to make hydrogen, than you will get back burning it for fuel.  So maybe we make nuclear plants that do nothing but hydrolyze water?  

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8 hours ago, jdsample said:

The problem is we don't know A.  We don't know what B will be in the future.  The point is that 50 years ago, your math predicted we would not have any oil today.  Somehow it is as abundant and cheap as it ever has been.  

Obviously this won't go on forever.  But let's not pretend we have found every drop of oil on earth.  

If you don't know A, although you probably have a pretty good idea about A for your particular country, the way to deal with the uncertainty of B is to reduce consumption via efficiency and alternatives.

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19 minutes ago, JoyinMudville said:

If you don't know A, although you probably have a pretty good idea about A for your particular country, the way to deal with the uncertainty of B is to reduce consumption via efficiency and alternatives.

And that is being done.  Energy efficiency is almost a fad.  The alternatives may be more energy wasteful and polluting than just turning off a few lights and wearing a sweater around the house.  

 

 

 

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NOTE: If the text is to small to read just hold down your [CTRL] key while rolling your mouse roller up or down.

,,.,.,.,,,,

I believe there is still one weak link in our energy future and that is battery storage. Wind turbines are great when the wind is blowing but unfortunately it does not always blow.
I envision you pull up to a filling station but instead of filling your tank with gas you stop over a exchange unit where your battery located under your car is removed and a charged one is installed. This gives you enough power to drive 150 miles before getting a recharged battery.

Now having said that one would ask, where are we going to get the electricity to charge these batteries?

 I believe I have found a possible solution.

Maybe & maybe not

There is an energy wall where the supper heated sea water is in constant contact with molten lava. With a temperature difference of 1303 degrees Fahrenheit

& this ridge runs on for about 1,000 miles.

Do you think this has potential?

Mid-Atlantic Ridge, submarine ridge lying along the north-south axis of the Atlantic Ocean; it occupies the central part of the basin between a series of flat abyssal plains that continue to the margins of the continental coasts. The Mid-Atlantic Ridge is in effect an immensely long mountain chain extending for about 10,000 miles (16,000 km) in a curving path from the Arctic Ocean to near the southern tip of Africa. The ridge is equidistant between the continents on either side

 of it. The mountains forming the ridge reach a width of 1,000 miles. These mountains sometimes reach above sea level, thus forming the islands or island groups of the Azores, Ascension, St. Helena, and Tristan da Cunha, among others.

https://www.britannica.com/place/Mid-Atlantic-Ridge

Magma is a complex high-temperature fluid substance. Temperatures of most magmas are in the range 700 °C to 1300 °C (or 1300 °F to 2400 °F).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magma

 Deep ocean water has a very uniform temperature, around 0-3 °C

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_ocean_water

 The temperature difference at the spreading Mid Atlantic is 1303 degrees Fahrenheit

 There is an energy wall where the supper heated sea water is in constant contact with molten lava. With a temperature difference of 1303 degrees Fahrenheit & this ridge runs on for about 1,000 miles.

 The reason it does not flash into steam is because of the huge pressure at that depth.

Do you think this has potential?

(:-

 

Edited by tooldtocare

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I believe there is still one weak link in our energy future and that is battery storage. Wind turbines are great when the wind is blowing but unfortunately it does not always blow.
I envision you pull up to a filling station but instead of filling your tank with gas you stop over a exchange unit where your battery located under your car is removed and a charged one is installed. This gives you enough power to drive 150 miles before getting a recharged battery.

Now having said that one would ask, where are we going to get the electricity to charge these batteries?

 I believe I have found a possible solution.

Maybe & maybe not

There is an energy wall where the supper heated sea water is in constant contact with molten lava. With a temperature difference of 1303 degrees Fahrenheit

& this ridge runs on for about 1,000 miles.

Do you think this has potential?

Mid-Atlantic Ridge, submarine ridge lying along the north-south axis of the Atlantic Ocean; it occupies the central part of the basin between a series of flat abyssal plains that continue to the margins of the continental coasts. The Mid-Atlantic Ridge is in effect an immensely long mountain chain extending for about 10,000 miles (16,000 km) in a curving path from the Arctic Ocean to near the southern tip of Africa. The ridge is equidistant between the continents on either side

 of it. The mountains forming the ridge reach a width of 1,000 miles. These mountains sometimes reach above sea level, thus forming the islands or island groups of the Azores, Ascension, St. Helena, and Tristan da Cunha, among others.

https://www.britannica.com/place/Mid-Atlantic-Ridge

Magma is a complex high-temperature fluid substance. Temperatures of most magmas are in the range 700 °C to 1300 °C (or 1300 °F to 2400 °F).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magma

 

Deep ocean water has a very uniform temperature, around 0-3 °C

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_ocean_water

 

The temperature difference at the spreading Mid Atlantic is

1303 degrees Fahrenheit

 

 

 

 

There is an energy wall where the supper heated sea water is in constant contact with molten lava. With a temperature difference of 1303 degrees Fahrenheit

& this ridge runs on for about 1,000 miles.

 

Do you think this has potential?

(:-

 

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I believe there is still one weak link in our energy future and that is battery storage. Wind turbines are great

when the wind is blowing but unfortunately it does not always blow.
I envision you pull up to a filling station but instead of filling your tank with gas you stop over a exchange unit where y

our battery located under your car is removed and a charged one is installed. This gives you enough power to drive

150 miles before getting a recharged battery.

Now having said that one would ask, where are we going to get the electricity to charge these batteries?

 I believe I have found a possible solution.

Maybe & maybe not

There is an energy wall where the supper heated sea water is in constant contact with molten lava. With a temperature

difference of 1303 degrees Fahrenheit

& this ridge runs on for about 1,000 miles.

Do you think this has potential?

Mid-Atlantic Ridge, submarine ridge lying along the north-south axis of the Atlantic Ocean; it occupies the central part of

the basin between a series of flat abyssal plains that continue to the margins of the continental coasts. The Mid-Atlantic Ridge

is in effect an immensely long mountain chain extending for about 10,000 miles (16,000 km) in a curving path from the

Arctic Ocean to near the southern tip of Africa. The ridge is equidistant between the continents on either side

 of it. The mountains forming the ridge reach a width of 1,000 miles. These mountains sometimes reach above sea level,

thus forming the islands or island groups of the Azores, Ascension, St. Helena, and Tristan da Cunha, among others.

https://www.britannica.com/place/Mid-Atlantic-Ridge

Magma is a complex high-temperature fluid substance. Temperatures of most magmas are in the range

700 °C to 1300 °C (or 1300 °F to 2400 °F).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magma

 

Deep ocean water has a very uniform temperature, around 0-3 °C

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_ocean_water

 

The temperature difference at the spreading Mid Atlantic is

1303 degrees Fahrenheit

 

 

 

 

There is an energy wall where the supper heated sea water is in constant contact with molten lava. With a

temperature difference of 1303 degrees Fahrenheit

& this ridge runs on for about 1,000 miles.

 

Do you think this has potential?

(:-

 

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I made five duplicate posts. I removed the text in four of them leaving the first intact.

Monitor, please delete the four empty posts

 

(:-

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