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Jefferson Airplane’s Paul Kantner dies at 74

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My goodness, they're dropping like flies. I guess we're getting to be that age, where our influences are just running out of lifetime. In addition to being part of the soundtrack to "coming up the years," the Jefferson Airplane (along with Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young) were leaders in the cultural changes that, through the baby boomer generation, are still happening. "Star children on the black road to salvation..."

 

Here's a good quote from an article in the San Francisco paper:

"Jefferson Airplane had the fortune or misfortune of discovering Fender Twin Reverb amps and LSD in the same week while in college. That’s a great step forward," Kantner told author and music historian Harvey Kubernik. "We went into it our normal selves.... The point is if you find something that makes you joyful take note of it. Amplify it if you can. Tell other people about it. That's what San Francisco was about. Both musically, idealistically and metaphorically and every other way. That's what we did here."

 

On a positive note, I have heard Jorma and Jack with Hot Tuna play several times in the last few years, and they're still going strong.

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coming true........

 

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/music/artists/bowies-death-marks-the-twilight-of-the-rock-gods/

 

Bowie's death marks the Twilight of the Rock Gods

 

With David Bowie’s final curtain-call, we are witnessing the end of an era, as the original stars of the explosive rock culture that convulsed the world in the second half of the 20th century are slowly extinguished. We are entering the Twilight of the Rock Gods.

 

Deaths of the famous compel us all to contemplate the meaning of our own lives and times, and the deaths of rock stars carry a very particular sting. Its most iconic figures – those great, symbolic archetypes of an age whose art, lifestyle and spirit was substantially defined by the egotistic and energetic values of youth – have turned into old men.

 

Whatever your reaction to Bowie’s death (the most elegantly stage-managed exit in pop history), we can be sure of one thing: that there is more of this to come.

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My goodness, they're dropping like flies. I guess we're getting to be that age, where our influences are just running out of lifetime. In addition to being part of the soundtrack to "coming up the years," the Jefferson Airplane (along with Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young) were leaders in the cultural changes that, through the baby boomer generation, are still happening. "Star children on the black road to salvation..."

 

Here's a good quote from an article in the San Francisco paper:

 

"Jefferson Airplane had the fortune or misfortune of discovering Fender Twin Reverb amps and LSD in the same week while in college. That’s a great step forward," Kantner told author and music historian Harvey Kubernik. "We went into it our normal selves.... The point is if you find something that makes you joyful take note of it. Amplify it if you can. Tell other people about it. That's what San Francisco was about. Both musically, idealistically and metaphorically and every other way. That's what we did here."

On a positive note, I have heard Jorma and Jack with Hot Tuna play several times in the last few years, and they're still going strong.

Those twins will ruin your hearing. Too loud for me!

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Signe Anderson, Original Jefferson Airplane Singer, Dead at 74

 

Vocalist who preceded Grace Slick passes away on same day as Paul Kantner

 

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/signe-anderson-original-jefferson-airplane-singer-dead-at-74-20160131#ixzz3zWeVJ0I4 
 

Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

Edited by boink

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Those twins will ruin your hearing. Too loud for me!

Oh I like it when they're loud. But do check some acoustic Hot Tuna sometime (there is oodles of it on Spotify). They can play some mighty sweet folk blues at barely more than a whisper.

 

On another topic, this weekend also saw the passing of Dan Hicks, another denizen of the early San Fran scene. Also 74.

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Oh I like it when they're loud. But do check some acoustic Hot Tuna sometime (there is oodles of it on Spotify). They can play some mighty sweet folk blues at barely more than a whisper.

 

On another topic, this weekend also saw the passing of Dan Hicks, another denizen of the early San Fran scene. Also 74.

Didn't dan hicks fake his death a long time ago? I'd heard he was killed in a bar fight....but again it was a long time ago.

 

"I scare myself thinking about you....."

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Oh I like it when they're loud. But do check some acoustic Hot Tuna sometime (there is oodles of it on Spotify). They can play some mighty sweet folk blues at barely more than a whisper.

 

On another topic, this weekend also saw the passing of Dan Hicks, another denizen of the early San Fran scene. Also 74.

That's so sad. When I was a kid I didn't listen much to country but I remember seeing Dan Hicks on midnight special or one of those shows. And I really like his swing country feel. I still listen to his music plus he had a great sense of humor.

I do know a hot tuna. I'm a big fan of jorma and a big fan of jack Cassidy the bass player

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zen- My favorite JA tune. Balin was solid on it

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