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EL-FLIPPO

Jazz Vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson Dies at 75

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Mr. Hutcherson’s career took flight in the early 1960s, as jazz was slipping free of the complex harmonic and rhythmic designs of bebop. He was fluent in that language, but he was also one of the first to adapt his instrument to a freer postbop language, often playing chords with a pair of mallets in each hand.

He released more than 40 albums and appeared on many more, including some regarded as classics, like “Out to Lunch,” by the alto saxophonist, flutist and bass clarinetist Eric Dolphy, and “Mode for Joe,” by the tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson. Both of those albums were a byproduct of Mr. Hutcherson’s close affiliation with Blue Note Records, from 1963 to 1977. He was part of a wave of young artists who defined the label’s forays into experimentalism, including the pianist Andrew Hill and the alto saxophonist Jackie McLean. But he also worked with hard-bop stalwarts like the tenor saxophonist Dexter Gordon, and he later delved into jazz-funk and Afro-Latin grooves.

Mr. Hutcherson had a clear, ringing sound, but his style was luminescent and coolly fluid. More than Milt Jackson or Lionel Hampton, his major predecessors on the vibraphone, he made an art out of resonating overtones and chiming decay. This coloristic range of sound, which he often used in the service of emotional expression, was one reason for the deep influence he left on stylistic inheritors like Joe Locke, Warren Wolf, Chris Dingman and Stefon Harris, who recently assessed him as “by far the most harmonically advanced person to ever play the vibraphone.”

He was named a National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master in 2010.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/17/arts/music/bobby-hutcherson-dies-jazz.html?_r=1

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RIP Bobby.

 

The last time I saw Bobby perform was on a jazz cruise in 1992. I took a photo of him playing the vibes along side of Bags (Milt Jackson).

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McCoy Tyner - piano (John Coltrane's main pianist)

 

Bobby Hutcherson - vibes (also recorded with John Patton, Duke Pearson, Lee Morgan, Tony Williams, Grant Green, Billy Higgins, Joe Chambers, Harold Land, Chick Corea, Stanley Cowell, Joe Sample, Curtis Fuller, Cedar Walton, Buster Williams, Joshua Redman, Nicholas Payton, , ,

 

Charnett Moffett - bass (He has performed and recorded with a long string of musicians, including Stanley Jordan, Harry Connick, Jr., Ornette Coleman, McCoy Tyner, Kenny Garrett, Mulgrew Miller, Courtney Pine, Arturo Sandoval, Lew Soloff, Sonny Sharrock, Art Blakey, Dizzy Gillespie, Joe Henderson, Herbie Hancock, Pharoah Sanders, Sonny Sharrock, Frank Lowe Ellis Marsalis, Wallace Roney, Dianne Reeves, Kenny Kirkland, David Sanchez, Babatunde Lea, Arturo Sandoval, Alex Bugnon, Kevin Eubanks, Jana Herzen, David Sanborn, Manhattan Jazz Quintet and Melody Gardot.)

 

Eric Harland - drums (In addition to leading his own group, Harland is a member of Charles Lloyd's Quartet, Dave Holland's Prism, James Farm with Joshua Redman)

 

McCoy Tyner / Bobby Hutcherson - Moment's Notice, Jazzbaltica 2002

 

In an April 2013 profile for Down Beat magazine, Dan Ouellette quoted Joey DeFrancesco as saying "Bobby is the greatest vibes player of all time... Milt Jackson was the guy, but Bobby took it to the next level. It's like Milt was Charlie Parker, and Bobby was John Coltrane.

Edited by EL-FLIPPO

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RIP Bobby.

 

The last time I saw Bobby perform was on a jazz cruise in 1992. I took a photo of him playing the vibes along side of Bags (Milt Jackson).

 

I saw him several times when Left Bank Jazz Society was still doing their Sunday matinee concerts.

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I saw him several times when Left Bank Jazz Society was still doing their Sunday matinee concerts.

 

Correction. The last time I saw Bobby perform was at the Rosslyn (VA) Jazz Festival in 2007. I had forgotten about that one. If I recall, James Moody also performed at that festival.

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