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hst2

WI Legislator Models the Political Correctness of Students

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When Wisconsin lawmaker Steve Nass was an undergraduate in his state’s public university system during the late 1970s, he reportedly got into a dispute with a liberal professor. In his telling, he got an F on an assignment for disagreeing with her belief that the world would run out of coal by the year 2000. For the rest of the semester, he grudgingly parroted her views in his papers even though he didn’t believe them. “So much for free speech,” he later said to Isthmus, a local publication.

 

Many years later, as a state lawmaker, he could have emerged as a champion for free speech on campus...Instead, he has spent decades identifying campus speech that offends his sensibilities and threatening to cut its funding unless administrators force closer adherence to his notion of what is politically correct. Would he take pleasure, one wonders, if liberal faculty members parroted beliefs that he finds sensible rather than what they really believe? This week, Nass made headlines while joining a colleague in threatening the university’s funding over a class it will offer next semester named “The Problem of Whiteness.” Triggered by the course’s title, the lawmakers launched a campaign to stigmatize it. As if following Saul Alinsky’s advice to “pick the target, freeze it, personalize it, and polarize it,” they went after the course’s professor, too, calling out old tweets that seem to make light of violence against police officers and demanding that the professor’s university superiors deny him a platform.

 

Nass has previously threatened the university system’s funding and suggested penalties for faculty members over an essay on the sexual preferences of gay men that a lecturer assigned to a sociology class; an arts festival called “Art in Protest” that he caused to be cancelled; a “cultural fluency” education program; a fact-sheet on “right-to-work” laws produced by a UW-Madison economics professor; and an invitation to Ward Churchill to speak on a UW campus that Nass wanted rescinded."

 

https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/12/a-wisconsin-legislator-models-political-correctness-for-university-students/511337/

 

 

Free speech for me, but not for thee.

Edited by hst2

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When Wisconsin lawmaker Steve Nass was an undergraduate in his state’s public university system during the late 1970s, he reportedly got into a dispute with a liberal professor. In his telling, he got an F on an assignment for disagreeing with her belief that the world would run out of coal by the year 2000. For the rest of the semester, he grudgingly parroted her views in his papers even though he didn’t believe them. “So much for free speech,” he later said to Isthmus, a local publication.

 

Many years later, as a state lawmaker, he could have emerged as a champion for free speech on campus...Instead, he has spent decades identifying campus speech that offends his sensibilities and threatening to cut its funding unless administrators force closer adherence to his notion of what is politically correct. Would he take pleasure, one wonders, if liberal faculty members parroted beliefs that he finds sensible rather than what they really believe? This week, Nass made headlines while joining a colleague in threatening the university’s funding over a class it will offer next semester named “The Problem of Whiteness.” Triggered by the course’s title, the lawmakers launched a campaign to stigmatize it. As if following Saul Alinsky’s advice to “pick the target, freeze it, personalize it, and polarize it,” they went after the course’s professor, too, calling out old tweets that seem to make light of violence against police officers and demanding that the professor’s university superiors deny him a platform.

 

Nass has previously threatened the university system’s funding and suggested penalties for faculty members over an essay on the sexual preferences of gay men that a lecturer assigned to a sociology class; an arts festival called “Art in Protest” that he caused to be cancelled; a “cultural fluency” education program; a fact-sheet on “right-to-work” laws produced by a UW-Madison economics professor; and an invitation to Ward Churchill to speak on a UW campus that Nass wanted rescinded."

 

https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/12/a-wisconsin-legislator-models-political-correctness-for-university-students/511337/

 

 

Free speech for me, but not for thee.

Will you be teaching the course?

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