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Saticon3

Hardware of Software Problem?

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Hi-- just doing another of my extreme amateur tinkering projects, have a perplexing problem-- Dell Latitude E 6400 laptop, recently I bought it as a "shell" and put in the hard drive from an identical one I had with a broken screen. It worked well for a couple of months. Suddenly, it won't do anything. It seems to boot fine, and at first it looks good, but after 2 or 3 clicks, it locks up, won't respond to anything. I can open a browser, download chrome, but, when I click install, that's it- freeze time.

Similarly if you try some other routine things. You get about 3, 4 successful mouse clicks, then freeze.

 

I did a fresh install of win 7 pro 64 bit, twice, from different install mediums, with genuine product key-- no change.

Did a fresh install of 7 pro 32 bit just in case it can't handle 64, which it is supposed to be able to do, but just to see, that didn't help either. Did I mention my 13 year old son uses it? Of course he swears there is no way a drink was spilled on the keyboard, and no trauma occurred to it, but........................... it almost acts like some keys are being pressed that aren't.

 

I'm thinking it may be a physical problem with the laptop rather than the OS? 

Do you think swapping the keyboard from the old broken screen one might make a difference? 

 

Thanks

 

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Have you considered the problem to be virus-based?

 

If you have Malwarebytes already installed, see if you can run it in Safe Mode.

wouldn't a fresh windows install wipe out any virus?

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wouldn't a fresh windows install wipe out any virus?

 

If by "fresh" you mean a "clean" install...yes.

 

A clean install involves re-formatting your hard drive (wiping it clean), re-installing your Windows OS from scratch, re-installing all of your non-windows software programs, restoring your backed-up files, and re-setting your pc preferences.

 

Otherwise, re-installing Windows over top of your current configuration may or may not eradicate any infected files...especially if System Restore is on during reboot.

Edited by EL-FLIPPO

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I've popped in xtra memory chips and changed DVD drives in laptops but that's about it. Don't have the nerve or tools to do much more. Seen Vids on You Tube on swapping out keyboards changing screens and other stuff but that's for those of you who are more adventurous. Fooling around in a Tower case is no problem for me but I'm too scared to pull apart a laptop.

 

BTW I'm typing this on a E6400 that I bought from Dell's refurb outlet on Ebay, geez, must be at least 4-5 years ago now, still runs just fine.

Edited by Bartman

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If by "fresh" you mean a "clean" install...yes.

 

A clean install involves re-formatting your hard drive (wiping it clean), re-installing your Windows OS from scratch, re-installing all of your non-windows software programs, restoring your backed-up files, and re-setting your pc preferences.

 

Otherwise, re-installing Windows over top of your current configuration may or may not eradicate any infected files...especially if System Restore is on during reboot.

Hey, Thanks!  I didn't know that, I thought re-installing windows wiped everything previous out-- didn't know I had to re-format to do that--- I'm going to give that a try. Makes sense now in retrospect, on another one I was working on I couldn't get it past Windows 10 auto- repair mode, even after re-installing windows 7, it still went to auto repair even tough I thought I had removed windows 10 completely -- that one had me scratching my head, now it makes sense-- I solved that one but I don't recall quite how-- maybe I did re-format in that case eventually. 

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I've popped in xtra memory chips and changed DVD drives in laptops but that's about it. Don't have the nerve or tools to do much more. Seen Vids on You Tube on swapping out keyboards changing screens and other stuff but that's for those of you who are more adventurous. Fooling around in a Tower case is no problem for me but I'm too scared to pull apart a laptop.

 

BTW I'm typing this on a E6400 that I bought from Dell's refurb outlet on Ebay, geez, must be at least 4-5 years ago now, still runs just fine.

I don't do a lot with laptops either, but have swapped a few keyboards, hard drives, RAM, touch pads, optical drives---  but I have a Lenovo Think Pad and switching the keyboard on that is a breeze- you don't even have to open the case, its just like four, five screws on the bottom--, that takes it loose, then pick it up from the top, undo the cable and reverse with the replacement. 

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A couple of things to try, it sounds like bad memory or overheating problem...

 

Check that memory DIMM's are compatible with your laptop if they're not original to the laptop. Make sure they're properly seated.

 

Make sure that all fans are running and that heatsinks are seated right. There are some programs that can read temperatures of CPU and graphics for you... look up on the internet if the temps you're getting are too hot.

 

Download free version of MEMTEST86 ( http://www.memtest86.com/). It is self-test that boots up the computer without windows and runs a bunch of  aggressive checks. It will tell you if the memory is bad.

 

If memtest86 fails, you might be able to adjust timings (the opposite of overclocking) or you can try swapping with other DIMM's.

 

 

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