Rael

Dallas Dance resigns

127 posts in this topic

But when you quit you usually have the next job lined up. His could have been resume writing because a problem was coming up. 

As  I see it there are only 3 possible reasons for Dance leaving

  1. The job was truly burning him out. I find this one hard to believe since he fought so hard for a commitment (way ahead of time) by the county for a renewal. Hmmm think about that one gang.
  2. He realized that he had over-reached in his vision and would be found out. Looking at his previous track record of slash burn bail ...it fits.
  3. He got caught with his hand in the cookie jar again and was given the option to quietly bow out....or else. :o

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Follow up - I am informed that they did have a semesterized system, with four 90 minute classes per day each semester. The advantage to that system is that a high school student can ear 8 credits in a year instead of the the 7 that can be earned when the schedule involves a 7 period day of 50 minutes each. With the A day / B day schedule the two semester systen can still be used but the students see their teachers in a particular class every other day instead of every day. From a staffing perspective the A day / B day schedule gives the administration flexibility to staff with part-time teachers for subjects that are hard to staff with full-timers - since such a teacher would work 3 days one week and 2 days the next. Not sure if that's particularly good or bad - depends on the teacher. It also gives schools the opportunity to share full time teachers between two schools - with a teacher doing all A days at one school and all B days at another if the two schools coordinate their days. So there appear to be pros and cons. 

 

Thanks for the summary. Funny when I was actually following that schedule it didn't seem that messy but now being retired for a couple of years I am amazed it worked so well.

One thing I liked about the 90 minute periods was being able to really really focus and spend time on a topic. Used to be 45 or so ...done...next.

Guess I am showing my age. ;):D

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Thanks for the summary. Funny when I was actually following that schedule it didn't seem that messy but now being retired for a couple of years I am amazed it worked so well.

One thing I liked about the 90 minute periods was being able to really really focus and spend time on a topic. Used to be 45 or so ...done...next.

Guess I am showing my age. ;):D

Some teachers like the 90 minute periods and some hate it. It does seem to work better in high school. In middle school the attention span of the kids sometimes does not last for 90 minutes, which I suppose is understandable.

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Posted (edited)

Some teachers like the 90 minute periods and some hate it. It does seem to work better in high school. In middle school the attention span of the kids sometimes does not last for 90 minutes, which I suppose is understandable.

Very true on all counts.

 

I will add, it seemed to me that those that taught the sciences seemed to like it, humanities not so much so based on lunch room discussions.

 

Which makes perfect sense. In sciences, the general outline of a class is lecture/theory, prep/setup of a lab and then execute the lab. Very time consuming and because of that. many times the three steps had to be broke up under the 'old school' periods,  which did not lead to excellent learning outcomes.

 

Now with humanities....say history. You can lecture about the battle of Gettysburg...for 90 minutes? Not. As you said lecture for about 30-40 minutes and you have lost them. Now some very creative teaches of history I encountered would follow the model I described above for science.

 

They would lecture... then have the kids set up a battlefield/diorama... and map out and move the pieces around to reflect the activities of the battle. They taught that on a day by day basis using the actual battles timetable. The following day there was a 'This happened today' lecture....adjust the diorama...get back in groups...what would you have done instead. Very innovative.

 

But then there are teachers, good teachers and excellent teachers.

Edited by Guido2

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I didn't like that he eliminated teacher positions, increasing class size, and expanded the management positions that seek greater control and conformity from the schools. With his focus on technology, I got the impression that he saw teachers as increasingly obsolete.

I am sure he approved of you indoctrinating captive students with your looney left ideology.

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Prediction: Dallas is going to need a criminal lawyer by the end of the year. You just don't quit a job like this with not plan forward. 

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Prediction: Dallas is going to need a criminal lawyer by the end of the year. You just don't quit a job like this with not plan forward. 

If he ends up at Pulaski before June 30 you may be correct. 

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If he ends up at Pulaski before June 30 you may be correct. 

Pulaski?

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Pulaski?

A facility of the Baltimore County school system (offices, support services) where staff accused of some sort of wrongdoing and are being investigated are sent to work in order to get them out of the schools. It is located off of Pulaski Highway in the White Marsh area. Every employee of BCPS is aware of what "being sent to Pulaski" means. 

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A facility of the Baltimore County school system (offices, support services) where staff accused of some sort of wrongdoing and are being investigated are sent to work in order to get them out of the schools. It is located off of Pulaski Highway in the White Marsh area. Every employee of BCPS is aware of what "being sent to Pulaski" means. 

Thanks, I wasn't familiar with the term.

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Some teachers like the 90 minute periods and some hate it. It does seem to work better in high school. In middle school the attention span of the kids sometimes does not last for 90 minutes, which I suppose is understandable.

 

Each school should be able to decide for itself.

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I am sure he approved of you indoctrinating captive students with your looney left ideology.

 

True dat.

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A facility of the Baltimore County school system (offices, support services) where staff accused of some sort of wrongdoing and are being investigated are sent to work in order to get them out of the schools. It is located off of Pulaski Highway in the White Marsh area. Every employee of BCPS is aware of what "being sent to Pulaski" means. 

 

Well my wife and I had about 35 years or so in the system. And I just asked her about the phrase. Neither one of us ever heard of it.

Guess it was because of squeaky clean impeccable success rates as teachers. ;):)

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True dat.

BEEEEEP BEEEEEP 

 

This is a warning. A geezer has attempted to look cool by using phrases reserved for younger humans.

 

This is the first warning. Repeated attempts to try to "look cool" will be punished in ways a geezer would not wish to contemplate. 

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Well my wife and I had about 35 years or so in the system. And I just asked her about the phrase. Neither one of us ever heard of it.

Guess it was because of squeaky clean impeccable success rates as teachers. ;):)

Ask around to some current BCPS employees. It's hardly a secret. When a school principal is suddenly gone from his/her school, and one walks into the Pulaski office and there he/she is working the reception desk, it can be awkward, to say the least.  :)

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Ask around to some current BCPS employees. It's hardly a secret. When a school principal is suddenly gone from his/her school, and one walks into the Pulaski office and there he/she is working the reception desk, it can be awkward, to say the least.  :)

 

In NYC, the practice is called the "rubber room". Teachers can sit around doing nothing, collecting full pay and raises, for years! (Link.)

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In NYC, the practice is called the "rubber room". Teachers can sit around doing nothing, collecting full pay and raises, for years! (Link.)

We tend to joke about it, but it is a necessity (as long as it is not abused). A teacher accused of improper behavior is entitled to have the allegations investigated, and if found to be false then the person needs to be given their position back. We are not talking criminal allegations, but rather some violation of policy. It has become fairlly commonplace for students (and sometimes parents) to make false (or highly exaggerated) accusations, and in fairness to the person accused of something they need to be placed in a non-classroom setting until the matter is resolved, one way or another. There have been instances of administrators being placed in that situation as well, and they also deserve a fair investigation (although if found to have violated a serious policy they can be somewhat easier to terminate than a tenured teacher). I have no doubt that in places with a very strong teachers' union like NYC a teacher who should be fired ends up on the payroll longer than one would expect, and teachers who should have been exonerated get stuck in limbo because of bureaucratic snafus. Your link seems to give examples of both. 

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We tend to joke about it, but it is a necessity (as long as it is not abused). A teacher accused of improper behavior is entitled to have the allegations investigated, and if found to be false then the person needs to be given their position back. We are not talking criminal allegations, but rather some violation of policy. It has become fairlly commonplace for students (and sometimes parents) to make false (or highly exaggerated) accusations, and in fairness to the person accused of something they need to be placed in a non-classroom setting until the matter is resolved, one way or another. There have been instances of administrators being placed in that situation as well, and they also deserve a fair investigation (although if found to have violated a serious policy they can be somewhat easier to terminate than a tenured teacher). I have no doubt that in places with a very strong teachers' union like NYC a teacher who should be fired ends up on the payroll longer than one would expect, and teachers who should have been exonerated get stuck in limbo because of bureaucratic snafus. Your link seems to give examples of both. 

 

But the investigation should take weeks or (at most) months; not years.

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But the investigation should take weeks or (at most) months; not years.

Yep. But we have bureaucracies to feed!   :D

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If Dance were being forced out for doing something unethical, I doubt he'd be allowed to work through the end of the school year

 

I don't know why he resigned but there are no signs that it was anyone's choice but his own...

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In NYC, the practice is called the "rubber room". Teachers can sit around doing nothing, collecting full pay and raises, for years! (Link.)

Yah pretty amazing. Unfortunately, this sort of thing gives tenure a bad name. Not that it is worth the paper it is written on anymore.

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If Dance were being forced out for doing something unethical, I doubt he'd be allowed to work through the end of the school year

 

I don't know why he resigned but there are no signs that it was anyone's choice but his own...

 

So far.....stay tuned. Remember it took some time for him to be outed on the double dipping scheme he had earlier on ..... hmmmmm maybe all that 2nd job extra work and finally caught up with him causing exhaustion. :rolleyes:

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good for him.  sad to see him go, but he has to do whats right for him and his family.  sounds like he has roots in richmond so that would make sense

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