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MTA BaltimoreLink Discussion Thread

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On ‎6‎/‎27‎/‎2017 at 7:38 AM, ivanbalt said:

We could stop destroying and rebuilding the infrastructure of Afghanistan.

The hell you say

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The trouble with the Red Line is that it was only one corridor.  The equipment was incompatible with other MTA rail stock.  Also, for all the complaining I've heard about Metro and Light Rail not connecting (despite a one block walk at Lexington Market),  a two-block underground tunnel to connect Red Line with Metro was not seen as an obstacle.  

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2 hours ago, Baltimatt said:

The trouble with the Red Line is that it was only one corridor.  The equipment was incompatible with other MTA rail stock.  Also, for all the complaining I've heard about Metro and Light Rail not connecting (despite a one block walk at Lexington Market),  a two-block underground tunnel to connect Red Line with Metro was not seen as an obstacle.  

Yeah the Red Line was deeply flawed. I'm not disappointed it was rejected, but I am disappointed the conversation about mass transit ended when Hogan pulled the plug. The BaltimoreLink plan was the worst kind of consolation prize.

As for the corridor, at least it was underground, safe from weather, and had a direct connection. The walk from the metro to the light rail is street level, in the weather, and is a loitering area for half the city.

Hogan might as well connect 70 to downtown at this point. If he's going all in on highways, might as well tear down those trees Mikulski worked so hard to save.

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Posted (edited)

The red line or at least some variant thereof has been planned since the early 60s as part of Baltimore's original heavy rail plan.  The NW line is our current metro line. The N/S line is our current light rail. The NE line  could be a metro extension from Hopkins to Morgan. I'm not buying that the plan was deeply flawed.  It would have connected to tow Marc Stations and places of employment from the Woodlawn area to downtown to Bayview.   Baltimorons just have a hard time seeing the bigger picture.

 

This thing should've been built long ago as ALL heavy rail...

http://www.roadstothefuture.com/BRRTS_Map_M.jpg

 

Edited by Marshan Man

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26 minutes ago, Pickle20 said:

Yeah the Red Line was deeply flawed. I'm not disappointed it was rejected, but I am disappointed the conversation about mass transit ended when Hogan pulled the plug. The BaltimoreLink plan was the worst kind of consolation prize.

As for the corridor, at least it was underground, safe from weather, and had a direct connection. The walk from the metro to the light rail is street level, in the weather, and is a loitering area for half the city.

Hogan might as well connect 70 to downtown at this point. If he's going all in on highways, might as well tear down those trees Mikulski worked so hard to save.

Therein lies the problem. Is MTA proposing any other improvements at all?? I've heard absolutely nothing. BaltimoreLink is definitely not some kind of ultimate solution to the area's future transit needs.  We're in the stone age when it comes to  mass transit here. Sad!

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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, Baltimatt said:

The trouble with the Red Line is that it was only one corridor.  The equipment was incompatible with other MTA rail stock.  Also, for all the complaining I've heard about Metro and Light Rail not connecting (despite a one block walk at Lexington Market),  a two-block underground tunnel to connect Red Line with Metro was not seen as an obstacle.  

You're right. That doesn't make any sense. You can walk to LR from the subway at Lex Mkt and t State Center. Even places with some of the best transit in the world this is the case.  I've had to surface and walk street level in both London and New York. And don't even get me started on some of those long arsed underground tunnels in NYC...

Edited by Marshan Man

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11 minutes ago, Marshan Man said:

Therein lies the problem. Is MTA proposing any other improvements at all?? I've heard absolutely nothing. BaltimoreLink is definitely not some kind of ultimate solution to the area's future transit needs.  We're in the stone age when it comes to  mass transit here. Sad!

Well, considering where I live now, Baltimore is transit Nirvana.  If I cross a couple of parking lots, walk through the woods, and cross a couple of abandoned railroad lines, I can catch this bus.

http://www.co.ocean.nj.us/WebContentFiles/a1c23138-80d5-4b86-84ec-82ee4a81681b.pdf

 

This bus stops in front of my house, but it's only three days a week, one trip eastbound and two trips westbound.

http://www.co.ocean.nj.us/WebContentFiles/d8411215-f712-4aa0-8d5b-491046f2bc37.pdf

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These OceanRide routes aren't on GoogleMaps or transit apps.

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http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/readersrespond/bs-ed-rr-0713-baltimorelink-letter-20170713-story.html

Quote

 

"Transformative.” That’s what Governor Hogan promised BaltimoreLink would be. And it is — but not in the way he meant. BaltimoreLink has “transformed” riding a bus in Baltimore into something much worse than it was before. It didn’t have to be this way. Groups like the Central Maryland Transportation Alliance and ATU Local 1300 reached out to the MTA to make recommendations on how to make BaltimoreLink better, despite having just been burned by the destructive cancellation of the Red Line.

Yet the leadership at the MTA and in Annapolis were not people for whom riding a bus was ever indispensable. Because, if that were the case they’d know that for persons with disabilities, seniors, people who don’t drive or can’t afford a car and many others, public transit is not an option — it’s a necessity.

They’d know what it means to take two or three buses, rather than one to get to work or school in the morning. They’d know how hard that makes it to be there on time — particularly for those with small children. They’d know how their back would hurt carrying parcels to a bus stop blocks away from where it was before. They’d know how fearful they’d be if their bus stop was moved to an unsafe area.

 

So, the transit union president goes on a rant, basically to knock Gov. Hogan.  How about some examples?  Do people in Brooklyn like the higher frequency of service on the Silver Line which travels farther north than North Avenue when compared to the 64?

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The end of an era.

 

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Having used public transport in other countries, I can assure you that even riders of long ago established public transportation complain about it. We Americans like to complain as well. 

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http://foxbaltimore.com/news/local/mta-passengers-voice-frustration-over-new-baltimorelink-transit-system

Another gripe session.

Quote

 

Dozens of MTA passengers have voiced their frustration with the new BaltimoreLink system, some claiming that the new system has resulted in more delays.  uring a town hall Monday evening, organized by the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1300, which represents MTA operators, many riders voiced frustration with having to take two or three buses to their destination.

Patricia Whitty, who works at Sinai Hospital in Baltimore, said: "The buses don't come on time, and it's not fair to me, it's not fair to my co-workers. It's not fair."  Whitty told the crowd: "I get off at 3:30, I don't get home until a quarter of six. That is not right."

 

I have to wonder where she lives that it takes her 2¼ hours to get home.  Is this every day?  Is she using the most efficient routing?

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I'll be down next week to ride more buses and see some doctors.

Oh, yes also going to the Orioles game.

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Made it back to Baltimore; I caught the train down.  Walked out to St. Paul St. and along came a 95 (Roland Park-Downtown) bus to take me downtown.

Before I could even be checked in to my hotel, the rain started.  It looked like a cell of heavy rain right over downtown.

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Was going to stop at Rite Aid on MLK and Saratoga,  but the 71 didn't come on time, so I walked down to Pratt and Light and just made the 94 in time go to LP Steamers.  Little did I know I'd have a loooooong wait (over 45 minutes so far).  They send you to the bar across the street and text you when your table is ready.

  

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About a 55 minute wait to get into LP Steamers. 

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Oysters from the raw bar.  Mmmmmm.

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Caught the 71 back downtown from Key Highway and McHenry Row.  It was about 10 minutes late, even though the Transit app indicated it was on time.

Coach 17055 had a video screen showing pictures of old streetcars and buses.

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1 hour ago, Baltimatt said:

Oysters from the raw bar.  Mmmmmm.

Yum!! :)

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3 hours ago, Baltimatt said:

Oysters from the raw bar.  Mmmmmm.

Matt you should try The Local Oyster in mt Vernon marketplace. 

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MM-- 

I'll keep that in mind for my next visit.   Thanks.

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Busy day.

54 to my podiatrist at University of Maryland Midtown.

94 to my old job, where they wanted to pick my brain, then stops at Hair Cuttery and Harris Teeter.

94 on to Ft. McHenry to get a lifetime senior pass for national parks before the price goes from $10 to $80 at the end of the month.

Charm City Circulator Banner Route back to my hotel, where I met my son who wanted me to help him with some of his personal business.  He drove us to lunch and then dropped me off at Rite Aid.

From there I caught the 80 to the 30 at Rogers Avenue Metro Station to the Red Line at York Road and Northern Parkway and back downtown.  Did get caught in the rain this time.

After taking a breather at my hotel, Navy to the ballgame and 76 back to the hotel.

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How'd it all go? Any long waits? Talk to any other riders to pick their brain on the new system?

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Pickle

 

Didn't really talk to anyone, but heard one or two people complaining.  One of my former co-workers likes the system.

 

Bus bunching is still a problem, and some buses were running late, some appeared to run early.  When I  caught LocalLink 94 at UM Midtown, it was about 4 minutes early, but when we got downtown after two detours (not reported on MTA's website) we were running late.

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