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zenwalk

R Lee Ermey Dead

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I always got a kick out of this guy. Mostly because he reminded me so much of one of my drill instructors on Parris Island so many years ago. 

Didn't he do a bunch of commercials on TV? Or am I thinking of someone else. 

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3 minutes ago, FatBoy said:

I always got a kick out of this guy. Mostly because he reminded me so much of one of my drill instructors on Parris Island so many years ago. 

Didn't he do a bunch of commercials on TV? Or am I thinking of someone else. 

My son and several of his Marine buddies, who went though Parris Island in 1998, said the same thing.

He hosted a couple of shows on TV but I don't know about commercials.

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My Uncle was a WW2 Marine Gunnery Sargent....did all the first wave major landings like Ok. and Midway. Somehow he made it home married and raised 4 kids.

Nicest most gentle man you ever want to know............unless you crossed the line....and you really had to cross it. 

And 'hell hath no fury' would mean nothing comparatively if you hit that line. 

 RIP Gunny

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I loved that guy! Old sergeants never die, they just fade away. Semper Fi Gunny.

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32 minutes ago, mrsmlh said:

My son and several of his Marine buddies, who went though Parris Island in 1998, said the same thing.

He hosted a couple of shows on TV but I don't know about commercials.

I knew I'd see him on TV, just can't remember what it was. 

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Very interesting how the Gunny got his role in FMJ! 

R. Lee Ermey went to director Stanley Kubrick and asked for the role of Gunnery Sgt. Hartmann. In his opinion, the actors on the set were not up to snuff. When Kubrick declined, Ermey barked an order for Kubrick to stand up when he was spoken to, and the director instinctively obeyed. Ermey got the role

https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0093058/trivia

RIP Gunny. And an Oorah from an Army guy! 

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18 minutes ago, FatBoy said:

I knew I'd see him on TV, just can't remember what it was. 

 

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He was in that Saving Silverman movie...blew some stereo types in that one.  ;)  Also great in Fletch Lives

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Rest in peace, friend.

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2 hours ago, Norman said:

 

Yah know......I am not saying his method will work in all cases.....but .....I think we need a few more people ...telling other people....get you poop together and deal with it. 

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He knew  if Kubrick heard a real DI that anything but the real deal would fall way short and be spotted by anybody that survived boot camp at P.I. . I had no idea who he was or how he got the acting job when I walked in the theater, but after he barked out his first few lines, I said to my wife, “ this guy is a real DI.” I don’t know how to explain it, but I’ve never seen a believable DI in the movies EVER, until R. Lee. Not even close. Jack Webb was a joke As a DI. It was obvious that R. Lee was a real marine, and was consulted on every detail in FMJ, except the suicide scene. No way Pyle gets a live round off the firing line, let alone a full magazine. At least not when I was there 44 years ago. Do we have any posters that have graduated boot camp recently? Is it different then the era the movie was about? It was spot on.

Rest In Peace my brother. Semper Fi. 

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18 minutes ago, Guido2 said:

Yah know......I am not saying his method will work in all cases.....but .....I think we need a few more people ...telling other people....get you poop together and deal with it. 

Don’t think the millennials would approve. Is there a “safe space” on PI now?😝

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11 minutes ago, mrdeltoid said:

Don’t think the millennials would approve. Is there a “safe space” on PI now?😝

My youngest son is considered a millennial.  He went through PI in 1998.

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1 minute ago, mrsmlh said:

My youngest son is considered a millennial.  He went through PI in 1998.

Did he notice any change in the way recruits were treated as compared to back in our day, basically the entire Nam era?

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I have a nephew who got his globe and anchor about 8 months ago.  Judging by his comments, it is as physically demanding as ever, and the battle problem at the end of boot is pretty intense.  Drill Instructors are no longer allowed the extreme actions they were allowed years ago - neither are nuns.  Not sure why that occurred to me as I was typing, but it is eerily similar.

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25 minutes ago, mrdeltoid said:

Did he notice any change in the way recruits were treated as compared to back in our day, basically the entire Nam era?

 

18 minutes ago, MiddleOfTheRoad said:

I have a nephew who got his globe and anchor about 8 months ago.  Judging by his comments, it is as physically demanding as ever, and the battle problem at the end of boot is pretty intense.  Drill Instructors are no longer allowed the extreme actions they were allowed years ago - neither are nuns.  Not sure why that occurred to me as I was typing, but it is eerily similar.

My son says that he thinks it may be as mentally and physically demanding as he has heard stories about and has seen in the movies but,  like Middle said, the DI's aren't allowed to get too extreme like they could in the Nam days.   

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1 hour ago, mrdeltoid said:

He knew  if Kubrick heard a real DI that anything but the real deal would fall way short and be spotted by anybody that survived boot camp at P.I. . I had no idea who he was or how he got the acting job when I walked in the theater, but after he barked out his first few lines, I said to my wife, “ this guy is a real DI.” I don’t know how to explain it, but I’ve never seen a believable DI in the movies EVER, until R. Lee. Not even close. Jack Webb was a joke As a DI. It was obvious that R. Lee was a real marine, and was consulted on every detail in FMJ, except the suicide scene. No way Pyle gets a live round off the firing line, let alone a full magazine. At least not when I was there 44 years ago. Do we have any posters that have graduated boot camp recently? Is it different then the era the movie was about? It was spot on.

Rest In Peace my brother. Semper Fi. 

I went through Basic in the Army in 1978 and often had policing brass detail. I still recall shouting "Brass! Live ammo!"  A full magazine might be a stretch, but a live round or two, sure. 

A company of 120 soldiers or Marines firing four 20-rd magazines each equals 9,600 rounds of ammunition. No one counted the spent brass to ensure all were accounted for. 

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35 minutes ago, mrsmlh said:

 

My son says that he thinks it may be as mentally and physically demanding as he has heard stories about and has seen in the movies but,  like Middle said, the DI's aren't allowed to get too extreme like they could in the Nam days.   

Prolly for the better. I understood it to a point, but I didn’t see the benefit of some of the physical abuse. I felt like it just made us more savage, and not in a good way.

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27 minutes ago, mlatoman said:

I went through Basic in the Army in 1978 and often had policing brass detail. I still recall shouting "Brass! Live ammo!"  A full magazine might be a stretch, but a live round or two, sure. 

A company of 120 soldiers or Marines firing four 20-rd magazines each equals 9,600 rounds of ammunition. No one counted the spent brass to ensure all were accounted for. 

Not on PI  my friend. It was counted on the rifle range, right down to the extra round for adjusting for windage. 

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He was at APG a few years back for that TV show on the Military channel he hosted.

Big Guns or something like that. he seemed like a down to earth guy for the few minutes I saw him.

I was in the Air Force and our TI's were puppy dogs next to a Marine or even Army DI was. Emerey sure fit the visual and audio stereotype for my impression of what a Marine DI would be like.  

 

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16 minutes ago, mrdeltoid said:

Prolly for the better. I understood it to a point, but I didn’t see the benefit of some of the physical abuse. I felt like it just made us more savage, and not in a good way.

My husband was an officer from 1969 through 1999 and he says that in his opinion the Marines going through PI with the less abusive DI's were the same gung ho Marines as those going through PI earlier with the abusive DI's.

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1 minute ago, mrsmlh said:

My husband was an officer from 1969 through 1999 and he says that in his opinion the Marines going through PI with the less abusive DI's were the same gung ho Marines as those going through PI earlier with the abusive DI's.

That’s good news! Now tell him to grab a cup of lifer juice.!B)

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