Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
PinkFlamingo

Doo-wop

5 posts in this topic

Every time MPT has these Doo-wop shows on I end up watching and singing along. I can’t believe how many I can sing along with!

So many memories from little transistor radios :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got my first transistor radio in 1962. I know that because PT 109 was the big song then.  Doo Wop was just before my time, stuff your older siblings would listen to.  The Beach Boys and the Beatles were the next evolution and much cooler.   Later came to like Billie Joel though:
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't a big fan of doo-wop music while I was in my mid-teens, but it grew on me as I got older.  American Graffiti helped seal the deal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Chesapeake Spirit said:

I wasn't a big fan of doo-wop music while I was in my mid-teens, but it grew on me as I got older.  American Graffiti helped seal the deal.

I was happy to see some young singers - 18, 19 yrs old - singing lead with a couple of the groups. It’s nice that doo-wop will live on. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have several hundred CD's of Doo-Wop, including rare group and B-side compilations.

There were a lot of independent, regional, and subsidiary labels in existence in the 50's & early 60's.

Off the top of my head, Marvin Gaye was a member of The Moonglows, Clyde McPhatter sang with The Dominos, and The Temptations' Otis Williams fronted The Charms. Curtis Mayfield with The Impressions, and Sam Cooke, Lou Rawls, Johnnie Taylor all sang Doo-Wop and A Capella gospel with The Soul Stirrers.

Doo-Wop was the "missing link" between Jump Blues and Rock & Roll as demonstrated by the jazz-inflected sax solos during the song's "bridge" section.

Roy Brown's 1947 Jump Blues hit "Good Rockin' Tonightt" is widely considered to be the first "Rock & Roll" recording. The song is a primer of sorts on the popular black music of the era, making lyrical reference to Sweet Lorraine, Sioux City Sue, Sweet Georgia Brown, Caldonia, Elder Brown, and Deacon Jones. All of these characters had figured prominently in previous hit songs. The song has also been credited with being the most successful record to that point to use the word "rock" not as a euphemism for sex, but as a descriptive for the musical style, a connection which would become even clearer in 1954 when a version of "Good Rockin' Tonight" became Elvis Presley's second-ever single.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0