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ms maggie

June 6

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Good day to think about the qualities of leadership and sacrifice and country above party.

D-Day. RFK. Proud memories for Americans.

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Posted (edited)

I often write here that the use of military force requires that the executive ordering the use provide a clear understanding of what is intended to be accomplished by that force.  https://genius.com/General-dwight-d-eisenhower-12-february-1944-directive-for-the-invasion-of-nazi-held-europe-annotated

Witness the clarity provided to General Eisenhower by the Allies.  Just 30 words that launched the largest amphibious assault in history;

"Task. You will enter the continent of Europe and, in conjunction with the other United Nations, undertake operations aimed at the heart of Germany and the destruction of her armed forces. The date for entering the Continent is the month of May, 1944. After adequate channel ports have been secured, exploitation will be directed towards securing an area that will facilitate both ground and air operations against the enemy."

I know this kind of detail may not seem relevant to all, but putting forces in harm's way requires that we make sure they understand why they are there.  Such understanding provides an understanding of the limits of actions available to the combatant and provides scope and direction.  Better yet, it gives them something to look at as an end of the danger in which the executive has placed them, that on accomplishment of this task, we go home.  Compare to the endless, senseless killing of Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan, etc. etc.

Edited by MiddleOfTheRoad

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12 minutes ago, MiddleOfTheRoad said:

I often write here that the use of military force requires that the executive ordering the use provide a clear understanding of what is intended to be accomplished by that force.  https://genius.com/General-dwight-d-eisenhower-12-february-1944-directive-for-the-invasion-of-nazi-held-europe-annotated

Witness the clarity provided to General Eisenhower by the Allies.  Just 30 words that launched the largest amphibious assault in history;

"Task. You will enter the continent of Europe and, in conjunction with the other United Nations, undertake operations aimed at the heart of Germany and the destruction of her armed forces. The date for entering the Continent is the month of May, 1944. After adequate channel ports have been secured, exploitation will be directed towards securing an area that will facilitate both ground and air operations against the enemy."

I know this kind of detail may not seem relevant to all, but putting forces in harm's way requires that we make sure they understand why they are there.  Such understanding provides an understanding of the limits of actions available to the combatant and provides scope and direction.  Better yet, it gives them something to look at as an end of the danger in which the executive has placed them, that on accomplishment of this task, we go home.  Compare to the endless, senseless killing of Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan, etc. etc.

Today's wars are more about justifying a half trillion military budget.

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One day this battle will be looked upon like people look at Saratoga, The Marne, maybe even Gettysburg. They may know of it, but no one will truly "remember" Operation Overlord other than from books, film or a statue. But the deeds they accomplished should never be forgotten. 

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3 minutes ago, mlatoman said:

One day this battle will be looked upon like people look at Saratoga, The Marne, maybe even Gettysburg. They may know of it, but no one will truly "remember" Operation Overlord other than from books, film or a statue. But the deeds they accomplished should never be forgotten. 

Well-stated

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General Eisenhower also wrote the Order of the Day.  The words may not have meant much to a nervous, frightened young man about to jump or wade into Normandy, but they resound now. 

 

Soldiers, Sailors, and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force:

You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months.

The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you.

In company with our brave Allies and brothers-in-arms on other Fronts you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world.

Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well trained, well equipped, and battle-hardened. He will fight savagely.

But this is the year 1944. Much has happened since the Nazi triumphs of 1940-41. The United Nations have inflicted upon the Germans great defeats, in open battle, man-to-man. Our air offensive has seriously reduced their strength in the air and their capacity to wage war on the ground. Our Home Fronts have given us an overwhelming superiority in weapons and munitions of war, and placed at our disposal great reserves of trained fighting men. The tide has turned. The free men of the world are marching together to victory.

I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty, and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full victory.

Good Luck! And let us all beseech the blessing of Almighty God upon this great and noble undertaking.

eisenhowerorderofthedayspeech_small.jpg

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When Ike was President, he made it a point to spend June 6 at Camp David, away from cameras and reporters. He didn't want the spotlight on him, rather those who had sacrificed their lives and well-being.

 

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1 hour ago, Struds said:

General Eisenhower also wrote the Order of the Day.  The words may not have meant much to a nervous, frightened young man about to jump or wade into Normandy, but they resound now. 

 

Soldiers, Sailors, and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force:

You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months.

The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you.

In company with our brave Allies and brothers-in-arms on other Fronts you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world.

Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well trained, well equipped, and battle-hardened. He will fight savagely.

But this is the year 1944. Much has happened since the Nazi triumphs of 1940-41. The United Nations have inflicted upon the Germans great defeats, in open battle, man-to-man. Our air offensive has seriously reduced their strength in the air and their capacity to wage war on the ground. Our Home Fronts have given us an overwhelming superiority in weapons and munitions of war, and placed at our disposal great reserves of trained fighting men. The tide has turned. The free men of the world are marching together to victory.

I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty, and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full victory.

Good Luck! And let us all beseech the blessing of Almighty God upon this great and noble undertaking.

eisenhowerorderofthedayspeech_small.jpg

Ike wrote another letter that day that he instructed his aides to release should Overlord fail.

Another profound example of leadership.

"Our landings in the Cherbourg-Havre area have failed to gain a satisfactory foothold and I have withdrawn the troops. My decision to attack at this time and place was based upon the best information available. The troops, the air and the Navy did all that Bravery and devotion to duty could do. If any blame or fault attaches to the attempt it is mine alone."

http://www.businessinsider.com/d-day-in-case-of-failure-letter-by-general-eisenhower-2012-6

 

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2 hours ago, ms maggie said:

Good day to think about the qualities of leadership and sacrifice and country above party.

D-Day. RFK. Proud memories for Americans.

Indeed.

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13 minutes ago, ms maggie said:

Ike wrote another letter that day that he instructed his aides to release should Overlord fail.

Another profound example of leadership.

"Our landings in the Cherbourg-Havre area have failed to gain a satisfactory foothold and I have withdrawn the troops. My decision to attack at this time and place was based upon the best information available. The troops, the air and the Navy did all that Bravery and devotion to duty could do. If any blame or fault attaches to the attempt it is mine alone."

http://www.businessinsider.com/d-day-in-case-of-failure-letter-by-general-eisenhower-2012-6

 

Yes ma'am.  That he maintained responsibility and accountability as integral parts of leadership into the political realm is - unfortunately - the way it was.   

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Not sure if you’re aware, but the soldier generally credited as the first guy to assault the beach made it all the way through the war.  Max Schroeder went to Glen Burnie High School.  Served in Korea and Vietnam as well.

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I did not know that.  It's only Wikipedia, but here is a link to this soldier's story.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonard_T._Schroeder

Leonard T. "Max" Schroeder Jr. (July 16, 1918 – May 26, 2009) was a colonel in the United States Army, who served on active duty from 1941 to 1971. As a captain during World War II, he commanded Company F of the 2nd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division in the Normandy Landings on June 6, 1944, landing on Utah beach in France. Leading the men of his company, Schroeder was the first American soldier to come ashore from a landing craft in the D-Day invasion.[1][2]

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36 minutes ago, ms maggie said:

When Ike was President, he made it a point to spend June 6 at Camp David, away from cameras and reporters. He didn't want the spotlight on him, rather those who had sacrificed their lives and well-being.

 

I did not know that. Thanks for sharing. 

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1 hour ago, mlatoman said:

I did not know that. Thanks for sharing. 

Learned about this on tour of Eisenhower farm in Gettysburg. Always stuck with me. 

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Eisenhower was a great man and an underrated president.

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Posted (edited)

32 minutes ago, Rael said:

Eisenhower was a great man and an underrated president.

Not bad "for a Republican", my father used to say. Despite his tepid support for civil rights, there is no place for him in the party today.

Edited by hst2

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My Dad was a Massachusetts Democrat right up until they ran Humphrey. He thought Humphrey to be “simple”, but just couldn’t vote for Nixon.  Not sure he voted at all after that.

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Always surprised me that the Allies were able to achieve even a modicum of tactical surprise.  

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Posted (edited)

21 minutes ago, MiddleOfTheRoad said:

Always surprised me that the Allies were able to achieve even a modicum of tactical surprise.  

Yes, seems incredible in retrospect. But Patton was cooling his heels as head of a fictitious rubber force further north  to lead the Germans into believing the landings would be more northerly. Plus the nazis had their own Trump to deal with and he believed the only feasible invasion would be the route Patton's ghost army was encouraging Hitler into believing. The Germans believed their Atlantic wall was impenetrable and it pretty much was. The U Boat pens of La Rochelle pictured in Das Boot are still there because they were that indestructible.  Had it been defended by a larger contingent the allies may easily have been turned back. The Dieppe raid earlier in the war was a miserable failure for the allies so it wasn't as if the Germans didn't have reason to be overly hopeful. 

Edited by zenwalk

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4 minutes ago, zenwalk said:

Yes, seems incredible in retrospect. But Patton was cooling his heels as head of a fictitious rubber force further north  to lead the Germans into believing the landings would be more northerly. Plus the nazis had their own Trump to deal with and he believed the only feasible invasion would be the route Patton's ghost army was encouraging Hitler into believing. The Germans believed their Atlantic wall was impenetrable and it pretty much was. The U Boat pens of La Rochelle pictured in Das Boot are still there because they were that indestructible.  Had it been defended by a larger contingent the allies may easily have been turned back. The Dieppe raid earlier in the war was a miserable failure for the allies so it wasn't as if the Germans didn't have reason to be overly hopeful. 

Funny you should mention Patton.  They thought Ike to be a bit of a farmer and didn’t respect him as much as they clearly should have.  They didn’t think much of Alexander at all, but Patton they respected because he was willing to fight a war of attrition - and the Germans knew they couldn’t win such a war.

Part of the reason the Germans were light is because they kept a heavy Panzer Division in the north - defending against Patton.

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D Day in HD is on the History channel right now.

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1 hour ago, MiddleOfTheRoad said:

Always surprised me that the Allies were able to achieve even a modicum of tactical surprise.  

Pas des Calais was the obvious target

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14 minutes ago, bmore_ken said:

D Day in HD is on the History channel right now.

Thx!

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52 minutes ago, MiddleOfTheRoad said:

Funny you should mention Patton.  They thought Ike to be a bit of a farmer and didn’t respect him as much as they clearly should have.  They didn’t think much of Alexander at all, but Patton they respected because he was willing to fight a war of attrition - and the Germans knew they couldn’t win such a war.

Part of the reason the Germans were light is because they kept a heavy Panzer Division in the north - defending against Patton.

The Germans found it impossible to believe Patton was taken off line. So it was a pretty cool ploy. No doubt the Brits were working the Enigma Machine overtime too in ways to encourage the Germans in their beliefs.  I seem to recall the allies planted a spy on a French beach with the fictitious invasion plans as well. Smart cookies.

 

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3 hours ago, Rael said:

Eisenhower was a great man and an underrated president.

He was my first president. One of my earliest memories of television. 

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