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EgyptKang

Net neutrality ends today.

27 posts in this topic

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/net-neutrality-ends-today-173000346.html

The FCC's decision to overturn Obama-era net neutrality protections goes into effect today, giving internet service providers leeway to block, throttle and prioritize websites and content. While we may not see the direct effects of this decision immediately, it is, in no uncertain terms, a massively important change that stands to alter the internet as we know and experience it.

WINNING!!!!!!

 

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9 minutes ago, WKDWZD said:

Fortunately for Europe, this is an American thing. We still have net neutrality ...

Lucky you.

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realistically, what went on different before the great obamas ruling and what will change after it's repeal?

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5 minutes ago, overtaxed said:

realistically, what went on different before the great obamas ruling and what will change after it's repeal?

Guessing you don't understand the issue like most of the Trumpists here.

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2 minutes ago, ivanbalt said:

Guessing you don't understand the issue like most of the Trumpists here.

Care to explain it to me then?  Which is basically what my post was about.

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5 minutes ago, overtaxed said:

Care to explain it to me then?  Which is basically what my post was about.

Right in the top quote. 

Quote

giving internet service providers leeway to block, throttle and prioritize websites and content.

Allowing a company like Verizon to throttle Netflix because they want to prioritize bandwidth for a competing service does not benefit the consumer.

Realistically, how is this a good thing?

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12 minutes ago, overtaxed said:

Care to explain it to me then?  Which is basically what my post was about.

Before President Obama broadband wasn’t that widely used. It was just maturing. Now providers have more control on the flow of the internet.

Without net neutrality they can now control who sees what and at what speed.

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3 minutes ago, EgyptKang said:

Before President Obama broadband wasn’t that widely used. It was just maturing. Now providers have more control on the flow of the internet.

Without net neutrality they can now control who sees what and at what speed.

You mean technology evolves and rules might be needed to protect the common good? 

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14 minutes ago, EgyptKang said:

Now providers have more control on the flow of the internet...Without net neutrality they can now control who sees what and at what speed.

That makes using encrypted virtual private networks (VPN's), and using peer blocking to avoid  content provider oversight, more relevant  than ever.

It also encourages continued use of underground peer-to-peer file sharing - avoiding most limits on content & speed.

Edited by EL-FLIPPO

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55 minutes ago, EL-FLIPPO said:

That makes using encrypted virtual private networks (VPN's), and using peer blocking to avoid  content provider oversight, more relevant  than ever.

It also encourages continued use of underground peer-to-peer file sharing - avoiding most limits on content & speed.

The problem with underground file sharing is twofold. It often blurs the distinction betwee legal and illegal plus it tends to be a breeding ground for all kinds of digital crawling nasties. 

Edited by Rael

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I don't disagree. I think we both have touched upon relevant issues.

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1 hour ago, Dinglehopper said:

You mean technology evolves and rules might be needed to protect the common good? 

So what you are saying is that net neutrality didn’t protect the common good?

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2 hours ago, EgyptKang said:

Before President Obama broadband wasn’t that widely used. It was just maturing.

That's not true.

There has been a slight increase in the last ten years, but home broadband was well established by 2009.

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3 hours ago, EgyptKang said:

So what you are saying is that net neutrality didn’t protect the common good?

Quite the opposite.  It did and it was good policy

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9 hours ago, overtaxed said:

realistically, what went on different before the great obamas ruling and what will change after it's repeal?

The internet is very different beast today than it was even 10 years ago, so its hard to make an apples-to-apples comparison.

However, Net Neutrality was a smart move anticipating the dominance of the internet as _the_ way to deliver media content and telecommunications.

When you get down to the core issue it hinges on whether you see "the internet" as a utility to which producers and consumers can easily connect with each other, OR, if you see "the internet" as something which is controlled by internet service providers and a collection of gatekeepers that mediate everything according to their interests.

Revoking Net Neutrality won't make immediate obvious changes. Instead, what you'll start to see is ever more complicated and fussy "plans" offered to consumers. Selecting internet service will become as much a ****-show as selecting a phone or cable-TV plan-- obfuscated to the point where it's hard to tell what you're actually buying and where you'll be subject to whatever insane rules the ISP deems necessary (and where the service provider's interests are paramount, NOT the consumer).

This is what happens when you have cynical "paid-for" politicians pandering to the needs of their true masters (whoever forks over the most money). 

Edited by dogstarman

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7 hours ago, dogstarman said:

The internet is very different beast today than it was even 10 years ago, so its hard to make an apples-to-apples comparison.

However, Net Neutrality was a smart move anticipating the dominance of the internet as _the_ way to deliver media content and telecommunications.

When you get down to the core issue it hinges on whether you see "the internet" as a utility to which producers and consumers can easily connect with each other, OR, if you see "the internet" as something which is controlled by internet service providers and a collection of gatekeepers that mediate everything according to their interests.

Revoking Net Neutrality won't make immediate obvious changes. Instead, what you'll start to see is ever more complicated and fussy "plans" offered to consumers. Selecting internet service will become as much a ****-show as selecting a phone or cable-TV plan-- obfuscated to the point where it's hard to tell what you're actually buying and where you'll be subject to whatever insane rules the ISP deems necessary (and where the service provider's interests are paramount, NOT the consumer).

This is what happens when you have cynical "paid-for" politicians pandering to the needs of their true masters (whoever forks over the most money). 

Bingo....Bongo.....Boingo!!!

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The USA seems to be making itself more and more isolated from the Rest of the World day by day.

Example

I don't think that this problem can be blamed entirely on Trump, but he sure as hell isn't making it any better.

Edit: This situation has been going on for around a month now, I am only able to participate in bulletin board by using a VPN set to a US IP server.

Edited by WKDWZD

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28 minutes ago, WKDWZD said:

The USA seems to be making itself more and more isolated from the Rest of the World day by day.

Example

I don't think that this problem can be blamed entirely on Trump, but he sure as hell isn't making it any better.

Edit: This situation has been going on for around a month now, I am only able to participate in bulletin board by using a VPN set to a US IP server.

That’s because of GDPR laws in the EU (which the UK is still a part of for a little while longer). 😀

The Baltimore sun just hasn’t been able to set up a compliance program yet— how many international folks read the Baltimore Sun anyway?

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5 hours ago, dogstarman said:

That’s because of GDPR laws in the EU (which the UK is still a part of for a little while longer). 😀

The Baltimore sun just hasn’t been able to set up a compliance program yet— how many international folks read the Baltimore Sun anyway?

It's not just the Baltimore Sun, the New York Times and quite a few others are also not in compliance. However, they don't seem to be trying too hard to comply, particularly as it's not exactly rocket science, all they have to do is give people the opportunity to accept their tracking cookies or not, like everyone else ... Simples really. 

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6 minutes ago, WKDWZD said:

It's not just the Baltimore Sun, the New York Times and quite a few others are also not in compliance. However, they don't seem to be trying too hard to comply, particularly as it's not exactly rocket science, all they have to do is give people the opportunity to accept their tracking cookies or not, like everyone else ... Simples really. 

It goes far, far beyond tracking cookies (that was dealt with in the “cookie law” from 2011-ish).

The cookie law applied to eu-based websites and concerned tracking of web users. The gdpr is vastly more sweeping and concerns, mostly, the storage and sharing of user data. Compliance is nontrivial and costly for any enterprise which is already operating. No one has been pinched yet, but the fines for violations are unprecedented, this law has some teeth. It is understandBle that non European news outlets which are already tight on money are taking a slow approach.

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On 6/12/2018 at 9:49 AM, dogstarman said:

The internet is very different beast today than it was even 10 years ago, so its hard to make an apples-to-apples comparison.

However, Net Neutrality was a smart move anticipating the dominance of the internet as _the_ way to deliver media content and telecommunications.

When you get down to the core issue it hinges on whether you see "the internet" as a utility to which producers and consumers can easily connect with each other, OR, if you see "the internet" as something which is controlled by internet service providers and a collection of gatekeepers that mediate everything according to their interests.

Revoking Net Neutrality won't make immediate obvious changes. Instead, what you'll start to see is ever more complicated and fussy "plans" offered to consumers. Selecting internet service will become as much a ****-show as selecting a phone or cable-TV plan-- obfuscated to the point where it's hard to tell what you're actually buying and where you'll be subject to whatever insane rules the ISP deems necessary (and where the service provider's interests are paramount, NOT the consumer).

This is what happens when you have cynical "paid-for" politicians pandering to the needs of their true masters (whoever forks over the most money). 

Well said. Thank you for the clarity. 

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8 hours ago, WKDWZD said:

I am only able to participate in bulletin board by using a VPN set to a US IP server.

That's interesting. Although I live in the States, I frequently log in with my VPN set to a non-US IP server.

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1 hour ago, EL-FLIPPO said:

That's interesting. Although I live in the States, I frequently log in with my VPN set to a non-US IP server.

If you try to access this site using an EU IP server you will see the message that I linked to and will not gain admittance.

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