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HumanSpirit

You'll Pay If You Give Up U.S. Citizenship

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Downunder--

 

Is that really true? How many people obtain Israeli citizenship under the Law of Return and retain their US citizenship?

 

Yes, I quoted what I know regarding Australia, New Zealand and the UK.

 

It's probably true what you posted :confused:

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More on dual citizenship

 

Most American dual citizens are Mexican-Americans. The most prominent is Juan Hernandez, born in Dallas, who is a member of the Cabinet of Mexican President Vicente Fox.

 

In 1998, Mexico, which had previously discouraged dual citizenship, passed a law declaring that any persons born in Mexico, or born to Mexican nationals wherever they reside, can claim Mexican citizenship even if they are citizens of another country.

 

...

 

Voting in a foreign election, serving in a foreign army, or swearing allegiance to a foreign government used to be automatic grounds for losing U.S. citizenship. But a 5-4 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1967 made it all but impossible for someone to lose U.S. citizenship unless he or she wants to give it up.

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Quote: " In this regard, Israel is really treated no differently than Canada, the UK, France, or other countries which permit people to become citizens without giving up their old status."

 

Matt I just posted that the UK and Australia don't care that you give it up - am I missing something here?:confused:

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Downunder--

 

Is that really true?

There are countries where, if one wants to become a citizen, they have to relinquish all other claims to citizenship elsewhere. I think it's true in India and Japan, and a couple of European countries, for example.

 

So, if an American citizen moves to one of those countries and decides s/he wants to become a citizen there, s/he has to give up being a US citizen because that country says so - not the USA. It may not be anything against wanting to be an American - in some situations, it may be a logistical issue (ie: being able to remain in that country, getting married to a citizen of that country, wanting to vote in that country, etc.)

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Sounds like something Hitler came up with to prevent fleeing Jews from taking most of their wealth with them. Then again the funds were created in America I guess it's only fair she get her fair share.

 

How many "fair shares" does the rapacious US Federal Government get?

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In this regard, Israel is really treated no differently than Canada, the UK, France, or other countries which permit people to become citizens without giving up their old status.

 

I'm taking that to mean that Canada, UK, and France don't require new citizens to give up their old e.g. U.S. citizenship.

 

Matt I just posted that the UK and Australia don't care that you give it up - am I missing something here?:confused:

 

I'm not sure if you are talking about becoming a citizen of the UK or Australia, or a Brit/Australian becoming a citizen of another country.

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I'm taking that to mean that Canada, UK, and France don't require new citizens to give up their old e.g. U.S. citizenship.

 

 

 

I'm not sure if you are talking about becoming a citizen of the UK or Australia, or a Brit/Australian becoming a citizen of another country.

 

LOL, no wonder I’m having so much trouble with my own personal dilemma.

 

My friend has just heard back from the Lithuanian Embassy (EU) he will be granted an EU passport, but has to denounce the US. Weather the US lets him retain his US citizenship is basically a flip of coin, one he’s not sure he want to chance.

 

For me, to become a US citizen I have to denounce the UK (I’m actually a Pom by birth). The EU will probably not care, but then I have Australia to worry about. None of the above are going to let me have triple.

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A Pomeranian?

 

Prisoner of Mother England, Aussie are lazy and abbreviate everything. Can you run up an put an "e" on for me ;)

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I'd never heard that one before. Thanks. I like it.

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LOL, no wonder I’m having so much trouble with my own personal dilemma.

 

My friend has just heard back from the Lithuanian Embassy (EU) he will be granted an EU passport, but has to denounce the US. Weather the US lets him retain his US citizenship is basically a flip of coin, one he’s not sure he want to chance.

 

For me, to become a US citizen I have to denounce the UK (I’m actually a Pom by birth). The EU will probably not care, but then I have Australia to worry about. None of the above are going to let me have triple.

 

Hey there girlfriend :) I'm going through exactlty the same mindset as you.

 

I'm completely confused about what to do, my spouse and kid are American by birth, but only my son automatically qualifies for NZ citizenship. I have the option of going for US citizenship (rather than permanent alien status) and I'm trying to figure out the "best" way to cover my bases.

 

The major complication is that we are all likely to move back to NZ permanently within the next 5 years but we don't want to jeopardize our ability to visit US relatives in the future.

 

I'm somewhat guessing that I will end up making some lawyer rich here....

 

P.S. You never told me you were a POM - lol

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The US is trying to break down walls to make it harder to hide assets. Even Swiss banks might not be safe.

http://cnnwire.blogs.cnn.com/2008/06/30/feds-seek-swiss-bank-records/

 

Here's another article today:

 

US tax probe ratchets up pressure on Swiss bank UBS

14 hours ago

 

WASHINGTON (AFP) — A US tax probe into bank accounts held by wealthy Americans with Swiss banking giant UBS heated up Tuesday, as a judge authorized investigators to seek financial information from the bank.

 

The Justice Department said a US federal judge in Miami, Florida, had issued an order earlier Tuesday authorizing the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to request information from Zurich-based UBS about certain US taxpayers.

 

Investigators believe wealthy Americans may be using Swiss bank accounts to evade US income taxes on billions of dollars of assets.

 

US law requires taxpayers to report all financial accounts in a foreign country if the total value of the accounts tops 10,000 dollars during a calendar year.

 

Banks often advise wealthy clients on how to legally minimize their tax bills, but it is illegal in the United States to actively evade paying income tax on earnings.

 

The Florida court order by US District Court judge Joan Lenard -- which was released by the Justice Department -- authorizes the IRS to serve a summons for information on UBS.

 

The summons directs the Swiss bank to produce records identifying US taxpayers who hold accounts with UBS in Switzerland.

 

Former UBS banker Bradley Birkenfield has told the court that UBS bankers helped affluent American clients improperly conceal assets offshore by creating "sham entities."

more:

http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5huKVcGfOk-31KoIUSAoTkMCgdrig

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Hey there girlfriend :) I'm going through exactlty the same mindset as you.

 

I'm completely confused about what to do, my spouse and kid are American by birth, but only my son automatically qualifies for NZ citizenship. I have the option of going for US citizenship (rather than permanent alien status) and I'm trying to figure out the "best" way to cover my bases.

 

The major complication is that we are all likely to move back to NZ permanently within the next 5 years but we don't want to jeopardize our ability to visit US relatives in the future.

 

I'm somewhat guessing that I will end up making some lawyer rich here....

 

P.S. You never told me you were a POM - lol

 

 

Hey Mate!

 

Are you on the Southern Cross mailing list? You might want to start with them before paying lawyers. You can ask questions, and they seem to have all the answers - with the exception of "do I really want to do this?" :eek:

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You move the money to the Caymans, or somewhere else the government can't reach it, then you leave, and THEN you renounce. What are they going to do, send the CIA after you?

 

Actually, you can do that without renouncing your citizenship. Just ask the Kennedys. You don't think thay bank in this country, do you?

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I'm not sure how it works , but Form 1040 has a question , Do you have any interest in foreign accounts .

 

If you do , and check NO , you are subject perjury penalties or you can take your chances.

 

I wonder what people with Swiss accounts do.

 

They check no

 

Unless they are Swiss, of course. Then they don't even fill out the form. :P

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With dual citizenship why would anyone want to renounce US citizenship. You can be a citizen of more than one country at a time.

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With dual citizenship why would anyone want to renounce US citizenship. You can be a citizen of more than one country at a time.

 

That's not quite true.

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That's not quite true.

 

 

I know, it is a complicated subject and I really have not gone into it in depth. I know one of them is Israel. There are countries, I think Saudi Arabia is one, where you don't have to have visa to enter the US and that just seems wrong.

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It sounds like the IRS can *ask* UBS to help them. Whether UBS is willing to do so is another question.

 

If the Swiss permit the IRS to engage in a fishing expedition of this sort, which is actually illegal under American Law (The Fourth Amendment has been interpreted to mean that such investigative tactics are unconstitutional), then they'll lose world respect - and a great many clients. I doubt they'll want that. We have nothing the Swiss want with which to coerce them.

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I know, it is a complicated subject and I really have not gone into it in depth. I know one of them is Israel. There are countries, I think Saudi Arabia is one, where you don't have to have visa to enter the US and that just seems wrong.

 

There's actually 26 countries you don't need a visa to enter the US. You get your visa stamped at the airport or port on arrival.

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oops 27 countries:

 

Currently, 27 countries participate in the Visa Waiver Program, as shown below:

 

Visa Waiver Program - Participating Countries.

 

Andorra Iceland Norway

Australia Ireland Portugal

Austria Italy San Marino

Belgium Japan Singapore

Brunei Liechtenstein Slovenia

Denmark Luxembourg Spain

Finland Monaco Sweden

France the Netherlands Switzerland

Germany New Zealand United Kingdom

 

http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/without/without_1990.html

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